first_imgThe members of the team include, back row, L-R, Naomi Perkins, Christina Champlin, Erica Tolles, Courtney Shrieves and coach Rachel Stewart.Front, Shaen Panko Dool, Morgan Sabo, Soleil Babcock and Charly Defouw. Missing, Sophie Borhi and coach Yoshie Measures. Nelson Figure skaters did more than just turn in solid performances at the Rossland Mini Competition, the Heritage City contingent won the event for the second time in 30 years.Staff and management at Mallard’s Source For Sports would like to salute members of the winning Nelson Figure Skating squad with Team of the Week honours.last_img

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first_imgF2 Logistics. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netRiding on a three-game winning streak, F2 Logistics has emerged as the hottest team in the league after a run highlighted by an upset of erstwhile unbeaten Foton.F2 coach Ramil de Jesus said the desire to win comes from the players themselves. And it showed.ADVERTISEMENT 30 Filipinos from Wuhan quarantined in Capas Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes Russian coaches to help train Pinoys Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town PH among economies most vulnerable to virus Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports MOST READ Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH We are young Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine EDITORS’ PICK View comments As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise The three-time champion Lady Troopers hope to come out strong against the star-studded F2 cast, who are led by imports Hayley Spelman and Sydney Kemper, offense threats Ara Galang and Cha Cruz, and  block specialists Aby Maraño and Mika Reyes. Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next “We’re not doing anything special, they (players) just told me that they wanted to win,” said De Jesus. “So I’m doing my best in guiding them to achieve that goal.”That spells trouble for struggling RC Cola-Army when they clash at 6 p.m. today in the Asics-Philippine Superliga Grand Prix at Gen. Trias Sports Center in Cavite.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSCone plans to speak with Slaughter, agentFoton collides with Cignal in the opener at 4 p.m.“Although we don’t have a chance for the third spot anymore, we will still do our best to win over F2 Logistics [and Cignal this week] to gain momentum in the playoffs,” said RC Cola-Army coach Kungfu Reyes. last_img read more

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first_img“At the same time, we do have a very specific set of regulations and we do have a specific set of principles and values that we represent not only as FIBA but also the sport of basketball.“So where these lines are crossed, then we have disciplinary procedures, and in this case there will be a disciplinary procedure.“So I better not comment further on that because there is an expert disciplinary judge of FIBA that will have to read the documents, ask the player for his position and then take a decision.”  Bogut has been targeted throughout the tournament in China by local fans upset at a tweet he sent in July about champion swimmer Sun Yang.ADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIES No need to wear face masks in Metro Manila, says scientist Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:04Daybreak as smoke, ash billows from Taal volcano01:05Poor visibility, nakaapekto sa maraming lugar sa Batangas03:028,000 pulis sa Region 4-A, tuloy ang trabaho03:57Phivolcs, nahihirapan sa komunikasyon sa Taal01:04Sold-out: Stores run out of face masks after Taal spews ash01:45Iran police shoot at those protesting plane shootdown France battle back to deny Australia Fiba World Cup bronze Heart Evangelista, Kim Chiu, more celebs appeal for animal rescue after Taal eruption Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. ‘People evacuated on their own’ Robredo to visit Batangas families displaced by Taal erruption LOOK: Taal Volcano island 2 days after eruptioncenter_img Teen dead, another hurt in vehicular collision in Santiago City MOST READ Australia’s Andrew Bogut (C) and David Barlow leave the court at the end of the Basketball World Cup third place game between France and Australia in Beijing on September 15, 2019. (Photo by Greg BAKER / AFP)Basketball’s governing body FIBA will launch disciplinary proceedings against Andrew Bogut after he appeared to suggest that referees favored Spain in Australia’s semifinal defeat at the World Cup.The outspoken 34-year-old Australian rubbed his fingers in a money gesture after a foul was called against him during Friday’s demoralizing double-overtime loss in Beijing.ADVERTISEMENT LOOK: Kryz Uy, Slater Young expecting first son Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Taal Volcano’s lava fountain weakens, but Phivolcs says it’s not sign of slowing down He then swore repeatedly as he trudged off court, directing his ire at FIBA as he passed through the “mixed zone” where journalists wait to talk to the players.The center played in Sunday’s bronze-medal match against France — and was loudly booed and jeered — but could yet be punished.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSAndray Blatche has high praise for teammate Kai SottoSPORTSBig differenceSPORTSAlmazan status stays uncertain ahead of Game 4FIBA secretary general Andreas Zagklis said that while there had to be some allowance for the high emotions after a defeat, Bogut will be asked to explain himself.“It’s not an easy task for them to withhold their emotions when they go through the mixed zone,” Zagklis told a press conference in Beijing just before the bronze-medal match and the World Cup final between Spain and Argentina on Sunday. View commentslast_img read more

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first_img Jack O’Connell Brentford new boy Jack O’Connell is expecting to go straight out on loan after completing his deadline day switch from Blackburn.O’Connell penned a deal until 2018 after Brentford agreed an undisclosed fee with their Championship rivals, where the defender had made just one appearance at Ewood Park after coming through the ranks.The 20-year-old made 19 appearances during a loan spell at Rochdale in the first half of this campaign and he is expecting another temporary spell away before linking up with his new club permanently in the summer.He told Brentford’s official website: “I think the first thought is for me to go back to Rochdale, or another League One club, and play more games.“Then I will come back in pre-season and fight for a place. I love playing, like any player, I just want to play. I play out from the back, which is why I think Brentford is a good move for me.“Brentford are flying. This is a club that is going forward and that is what they said to me. That is one of the biggest reasons why I have signed.“I want to hit the ground running in pre-season, if I go out on loan, and then get a spot in the team.” 1last_img read more

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first_imgRe “Foreclosure aid may be on way” (Business, Aug. 2): Why does City Councilman Richard Alarc&oacute:n think that it is my responsibility to bail out mortgage companies, big banks and individuals who make bad business decisions? I take responsibility for the decisions (good and bad) that I make and find it reprehensible that an elected official would take my money to gain access to contributions from big business and to buy votes. The ruse is called socialism. There are a growing number of citizens (myself included) who are getting mighty upset with government officials and their socialistic tactics. – Carol Milton Woodland Hills How many cops? Re “How many cops work the Valley?” (Aug. 2): While the City Council diddles around with a nonproblem that affects hardly anybody, like smoking in parks, the gangs are running rampant and taking control of large areas of the city, which affects so many people. Then Councilman Greig Smith spouts nonsense, like the LAPD has more officers than it ever had. Oh, we’ll sleep so much better knowing that. The point is not that we have MORE officers, but do we have ENOUGH police officers? – Sandy Sand West Hills It’s about money Re “Council tackles two burning issues” (Aug. 2): Two City Council stories are on the front page today. One about it thumbing its nose at federal law and the other about banning smoking in parks. People who think it has the best interests of the citizens at heart need their heads examined. Continuing the illegal sales of marijuana means eventual tax dollars. Banning smoking in parks is a great idea, but the council isn’t doing it to protect nonsmokers. If the public good came first, sales and use of smoking tobacco would be illegal in L.A. By banning smoking in certain areas, it guarantees money coming in from fines and taxes from tobacco sales. The City Council’s actions are all about getting our money, nothing else. – John R. Schlank Granada Hills Community work Thank you for the wonderful article, “Graffiti fighter gains crew” (Aug. 2) on your front page, no less. I was beginning to think it was reserved for naughty movie stars and superstars. It was so nice to see some good news about people doing things for their community. The Coronado family and De La Salle School are the superstars here, in reminding us of what can be done by those who truly care and by taking their own time to make the community a better place. – Rosemary McAnany Chatsworth Radio royalties? Re “Berman vows to change radio royalties” (Aug. 2): With the myriad of problems facing this country, it is beyond my comprehension as to why Rep. Howard Berman would put an emphasis on radio royalties. Who cares about Patsy Cline’s estate? Every time we read a book, should we pay the author and publisher? Every time we sit on a couch, should we pay the furniture company? Every time we play a CD at home, should we pay the record company? (Albeit, I sure don’t want to give the politicians any more dumb ideas.) Our politicians need to get working on the very pressing concerns of the United States and stop this foolishness. – Karen Jackson Valley Village Community planning Re “Balancing needs” (Our Opinions, Aug. 2): To quote the Daily News, the “old ways of building anything anywhere with little regard for surrounding neighborhoods, no longer works ….” That is precisely the point. Home Depot is appropriate for industrial zones. The proposed Foothill site is in a community-oriented small-business and residential area. Since Kmart closed, residents must drive to Glendale or Burbank to shop for everyday necessities. And so far as Home Depot supplying “needed jobs,” a general merchandise store provides jobs, too, and would better serve the surrounding community. Isn’t that what community planning is all about? – Deb Baumann Sun Valley The important things Re “Petty cash” (Your Opinions, Aug. 2): As a voter, I resent being called a “moron” by letter writer Bill Merriman. Maybe we allow incompetent bureaucrats to squander billions and billions of dollars, but we never lose sight of truly important issues. Don’t forget, we jailed notorious criminal Paris Hilton, cheered the coronation of Queen Victoria Beckham, shunned the jezebels Lindsay and Britney, and most importantly, demanded the return of our comics. – Michael Guetzow Woodland Hills Budget impasse Our legislators have one job: the state budget. The Assembly did its job. The governator stands ready to do his. Our Senate has failed its most important task. They need to compromise or resign. How do we encourage action? Stop payments to senators and their staffs. Require that they return funds received after the budget deadline. Stop payment to all commissioners and commissions (coastal, transportation, environmental, etc.). They don’t need to meet when there’s no money to spend. Halt state construction projects. Assure funding for health and human services, education, assistance programs and law enforcement. Taxes are coming in and citizens come before politicians. Immediately start the process of recalling every member of the state Senate. – Pete Brown Sylmar [Where the fault lies Re “Less is more” (Your Opinions, Aug. 1): I agree with the Sylmar lady who wrote “Less is more.” Let’s stop those pesky illegals. They are the main reason for our freeway gridlock and overcrowded public transportation (sarcasm). Ask their employers to stop hiring them as nannies, construction workers, gardeners, and carwash attendants. This would make more room on the freeways for their employers’ BMWs and Escalades. I use both freeways and Metrolink and see more legal immigrants than illegal. People need a reality check. Stop blaming the illegals. Blame the government for allowing them in and blame your law-breaking neighbors, friends and family for hiring them. – Manny Rodriguez Simi Valley Wise and enlightened Re “Less is more” (Your Opinions, Aug. 1): How mesmerized and amazed I was to read your opinion on how to fix the gridlock problem. I still cannot get over all the wisdom and enlightenment I received by reading such a complex idea. Perhaps you should work for our wonderful president, George “War” Bush, because with such bright ideas, you should be driving your own car with the whole freeway to yourself. And to improve upon your wonderful, terrific, amazing idea, let us stop ignorant folks from driving. That way, streets, freeways and highways will be nearly empty. – Edgardo Sanchez Canoga Park It takes a human Re “Glorifying pit bulls” (Your Opinions, July 28): Pit bulls are protective by nature, but not innately destructive. It takes a human to make them killers. News stories involving pit bulls represent a sociological problem with the owners, not a biological problem with the breed. I had two dogs when my kids were born. My pit bull mix was great with the kids, and very protective of the family and house. My fluffy shepherd-mix would nip at the kids if they romped too much or too closely. – John S. Green Northridge Learning from Ron President Bush could and should learn something from such people as Daily News Editor Ron Kaye. Hats off to Kaye, who listened when the readers let him know loud and clear that they weren’t happy with the changes in the comics, etc. He publicly apologized and has taken the necessary steps to correct the situation. He even went so far as to include missed strips of comics with ongoing story lines. Are you listening, George? – Carolyn Whitehead Canyon Country [Setting an example In view of the almost impossible task of uniting the Shiites, Sunnis and Kurds to create a viable government, the least Congress can do is learn what the frightening consequences are of unbridled partisan hatred. Watching our Congress, with its mutual distrust, seems like a copycat version of what is is happening in Iraq. – Harold Gold Woodland Hills Whatcha smokin’? L.A.’s leaders want pot smokin’ to be OK, and cigarette smokin’ to be fined $250, citing the mantra: “It’s for the kids.” – J. L. Hiller Lancaster160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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first_imgWho’s king of the roads?Often in the Premier League there’s a notable difference in the form of clubs on home soil compared to on the road.Home fans do their best to create the most intimidating of environments for the visiting team, which can play on the nerves of the players in unfamiliar territory.For some clubs, however, it can have quite the opposite effect.So we’ve taken a look at the results and have put together a Premier League table based on each team’s away form only.Check out where your side ranks by scrolling through the gallery above.Standings correct on 17 January 2017.ALSO SEE: HOW THE PREMIER LEAGUE TABLE WOULD LOOK BASED ON HOME RESULTS ONLY 8. Stoke City have collected 12 points on the road from 11 games – Current record: W3, D3, L5, GD-6 20 20 20 20 20. Burnley have picked up just one point away from home in nine games, a complete contrast to the 25 they’ve secured at Turf Moor – click the arrow above, right, to check out the Premier League table based on away results only in full – Current record: D1, L8, GD-17 4. Manchester City have collected 21 points on the road from 11 games – Current record: W7, L4, GD+6 20 20 3. Arsenal have collected 21 points on the road from 11 games – Current record: W6, D3, L2, GD+15 7. West Bromwich Albion have collected 12 points on the road from 11 games – Current record: W3, D3, L5, GD-5 15. Bournemouth have collected eight points on the road from 11 games – Current record: W2, D2, L7, GD-11 2. Liverpool have collected 22 points on the road from 12 games – Current record: W6, D4, L2, GD+6 14. Watford have collected eight points on the road from 10 games – Current record: W2, D2, L6, GD-11 18. Hull City have collected four points on the road from 10 games – Current record: W1, D1, L8, GD-18 12. Crystal Palace have collected nine points on the road from 11 games – Current record: W2, D3, L6, GD-8 20 1. Chelsea have collected 25 points on the road from 11 games – Current record: W8, D1, L2, GD+8 20 20 20 9. Everton have collected 11 points on the road from 10 games – Current record: W3, D2, L5, GD-3 20 10. Middlesbrough have collected nine points on the road from 11 games – Current record: W1, D6, L4, GD-4 13. West Ham United have collected eight points on the road from 10 games – Current record: W2, D2, L6, GD-5 20 16. Swansea City have collected seven points on the road from 10 games – Current record: W2, D1, L7, GD-13 6. Tottenham Hotspur have collected 16 points on the road from 10 games – Current record: W4, D4, L2, GD+9 17. Sunderland have collected four points on the road from 10 games – Current record: W1, D1, L8, GD-14 20 20 20 5. Manchester United have collected 20 points on the road from 10 games – Current record: W6, D2, L2, GD+4 19. Leicester City have collected three points on the road from 10 games – Current record: D3, L7, GD-13 11. Southampton have collected nine points on the road from 11 games – Current record: W2, D3, L6, GD-6 20 20 20 20 20last_img read more

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first_imgA reader emailed me yesterday.“Hey Eric, Clients are wondering about value of settlement NDAs after ex-Fox News HWE victims go public despite contracts. Your reaction?”Wait! You mean employees actually violate confidentiality provisions?I know, right?By way of brief background, in late July, New York ran a story by Gabriel Sherman, suggesting a recent high-profile example. That is, two female Fox employees were allegedly sexually harassed by former Fox News boss, Roger Ailes. The Sherman story includes details of a 2011 settlement agreement between the women and Fox. An agreement that supposedly included “extensive nondisclosure provisions.”Now, before I react to the reader question, I remind everyone of the standard disclaimer.My initial reaction was shock. Specifically, I was shocked to learn that: (a) someone other than my father reads this blog; and (b) someone other than my father would take the time to email me about the blog. [Ok, before I really react, I’m going to ignore the National Labor Relations Act and other EEO/anti-retaliation considerations here. I’m assuming that they do not exist. I’m also assuming that most employees do abide by non-disclosure provisions. I’m not that cynical. Not on Thursdays, at least.]For me, the answer is easy: if you want a non-disclosure provision to have value, then assign it some value. I’m not talking about that boilerplate language about how confidentiality is a material term of the agreement. It doesn’t hurt to have that language, but, it’s not going to dissuade someone who wants to share the terms of the agreement from actually sharing them.No, you need something with real teeth. I’m a believer that the mere specter of financial loss is enough to deter someone from talking.But, ok. How much loss? And will it be enforceable?One option is to provide that an employee who breaches confidentiality must pay actual damages to the employer, including the attorney’s fees and costs incurred in enforcing the settlement agreement. Courts regularly enforce these “actual damages” provisions. But, good luck demonstrating actual damages. Most times, the juice won’t be worth the squeeze. But, I’ve never sought enforcement of one of these.Another option is a liquidated damages provision. Here in Pennsylvania, you can assess liquidated damages where actual loss is hard to calculate and the liquidated damages amount is a reasonable estimate of damages. From my ERISA days, twenty percent of the settlement amount sounds about right. And, the nice thing about twenty percent is that, rarely, does the employee balk at the provision. But, I’ve never sought enforcement of one of these.Yet another option I’ve seen (and used from time to time) is a more draconian provision requiring repayment of the entire settlement sum (including any share paid to the employee’s lawyer) less $500. This provision is all about flexing enough muscle to discourage an employee from testing it. Of course, it comes with enforcement risks (it screams “unreasonable.”) Thus, this is not a provision I’d employ with a large settlement sum. However, in a smaller settlement, I wouldn’t hesitate to recommend it knowing the opportunity cost to the employee, which would include paying an attorney to defend. But, I’ve never sought enforcement of one of these.Ultimately, my evidence here is all anecdotal. That is, rarely am I presented with hard facts to support a non-disclosure breach. And, then, there’s the prospect of throwing good money after bad to enforce. Plus, I’ve never sought enforcement.I’d like to hear from you.Since I don’t really have a great answer, email me and let me know how you have navigated confidentiality provisions in employment-related settlement agreements.Originally posted on the Employer Handbook Blog.last_img read more

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first_img“Business process management (BPM) is the discipline of managing processes (rather than tasks) as the means for improving business performance outcomes and operational agility. Processes span organizational boundaries, linking together people, information flows, systems and other assets to create and deliver value to customers and constituents.”  (Defined by Gartner)  Key vendors in this market include IBM, Oracle, Tibco, and OpenText.Globally, the BPM market is expected to grow at about 14 percent over the next two years, as estimated by ResearchMoz.us.  Businesses are adopting BPM in order to improve both their productivity and competitive advantage.  In particular, demand is increasing for cloud-based BPM, but adoption is being cooled by implementation costs which can often be high.A survey by CapGemini found the 78 percent of businesses said that the implementation of BPM improved the flexibility of their organization.  Similarly, 78 percent that BPM has helped improve their interactions with clients and the use of their CRM systems.John Dixon, managing vice president at Gartner, said that organizations are finding that BPM can “make a significant contribution to driving key business outcomes and boosting business performance.  In difficult economic times, the ability to respond in an agile manner to uncertain and changing business conditions is a true competitive differentiator. BPM enables organizations to become more agile and proactive, rather than reactive, when change occurs.”Patrick McLendon, manager of systems and programming at Vulcan Materials, said that with BPM “we have eliminated a lot of the busy work and rework… Anybody in a mid-sized to large company, like us, who isn’t doing this now needs to be on it.  It has been a force multiplier for us.”Hard economic ties since 2008 have actually been a driver for growth in the BPM industry.  Businesses are using it as a tool to try to wring as much productivity as they can from existing customers.  The popularity of the software has enabled some BPM vendors to have seen growth rates near 30 percent.  Forrester estimates the BPM market to be close to $6.6 billion.last_img read more

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first_imgA new analysis challenges a troubling 2011 study that suggested that black researchers encounter racial bias when they seek funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The report finds that African Americans do just as well as whites at similar institutions who have an equivalent research record. In the 2011 study published in Science, economist Donna Ginther of the University of Kansas, Lawrence, and co-workers probed years of confidential NIH grants data. They found that black scientists’ chances of winning a grant for their research idea were a startling 10 percentage points lower than for white scientists even after controlling for their institution, research training, and publication record. NIH Director Francis Collins was shaken by the results; one possible explanation was that peer reviewers might have an unconscious bias against African Americans, he said. Collins and his advisers came up with an action plan. Last December, NIH announced a $500 million, 10-year program aimed at boosting the number of young minority scientists and improving mentoring for minority researchers. To reduce the potential for racial bias, NIH also plans a pilot project that will test peer review of research proposals that have been made anonymous. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) Questions have persisted, however, about the Ginther study (see letters here). Now, another research group has examined the possible role of racial bias at NIH by comparing head-to-head the productivity and funding of black and white medical researchers at the same institutions. Biomedical engineer Ge Wang of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech) in Blacksburg and co-authors at several institutes randomly selected 40 black faculty members and 80 white faculty members at the top-ranked 92 U.S. medical schools. They developed an algorithm for assessing a scientist’s productivity that took into account such factors as number of publications, the scientists’ role on each paper, the journals’ impact factor, and citations. Compared with white faculty members in similar positions at the same set of institutions, the black scientists were less productive, Wang’s team found. They then looked a subset of 11 black and 11 white researchers with NIH funding. Compared to white scientists with the same productivity index, the black researchers had just as many, if not more, grants and research dollars. “Individual performance determines NIH award success, while the evidence for racial bias is scant,” says Wang, who this week moved from Virginia Tech to Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York. Ginther has reservations about the study, published yesterday in the Journal of Informetrics. She notes that the study looked at a small number of researchers and didn’t examine their chances of winning funding, just how much they ultimately got. She also questions Wang’s team’s decision to weight first and last authors equally, because the principal investigator is usually the last author. Even if the findings are valid, they “complement” rather than contradict her work, Ginther says. As her team looks more closely at productivity, they, too, are finding that it explains some of the gap in blacks’ and whites’ success rates. But it’s not the whole answer, she says, because “there’s still a significant gap.” Ginther also points out that in their Science paper, her team said another explanation for the racial gap could be that black scientists submit weaker proposals. That might reflect the fact that blacks have less access to mentors than their white colleagues—a possible problem that NIH’s plan will address. “I think they’re [Wang’s team] making a mountain out of a molehill when it comes to the bias question,” Ginther says.last_img read more

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first_imgThe zombie apocalypse may be more than just a horror story for some bacteria. New research shows that when exposed to a microbe-slaying silver solution, the germs can “go zombie,” wiping out their living compatriots even after death. The results may explain silver’s long-lasting antibacterial power and could improve the performance of medical products that keep us safe from harmful pathogens.The use of silver in medicine dates back thousands of years, and scientists have long known that the metal is a potent antibacterial agent. Silver ions perform their deadly work by punching holes in bacterial membranes and wreaking havoc once inside. They bind to essential cell components like DNA, preventing the bacteria from performing even their most basic functions.But silver’s “zombie effect” has gone unrecognized—until now. To uncover this grisly mechanism, scientists first killed a sample of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa using a solution of silver nitrate. Then, they carefully separated the dead bacteria from the silver solution. When they exposed living bacteria to the dead, they witnessed a microscopic massacre: Up to 99.99% of the living bacteria met their doom.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Using electron microscopy, the researchers imaged the dead bacteria and discovered what caused them to go on their killing spree. Reservoirs of silver nanoparticles had built up in their corpses, indicating that the dead bacteria act like sponges, soaking up silver as they die. The stored silver can leach out to the environment, “especially if the environment contains other sponges for that silver,” says chemist David Avnir of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, the senior author of the new study. “In our case, the other sponge is a living bacterium.”The researchers, who published their findings last week in Scientific Reports, also looked at the killing power of the solution they separated from the zombie bacteria. When they started with low concentrations of silver nitrate, the leftover solution wasn’t strong enough to completely wipe out the second round of bacteria. This indicates the bacteria are actually removing silver from the solution, researchers say. When they started out with high concentrations of silver nitrate, the solution retained its killing power through both groups of bacteria, presumably because the first round of bacteria hadn’t been able to soak up all of the silver. “This is an important aspect of [silver] that I’ve not seen anyone talk about before,” says molecular microbiologist Simon Silver of University of Illinois, Chicago, who was not involved in the research. “This paper is a new spin on it, to me, and I think rather a good one.”The finding could lead to an enhanced ability to control the longevity of silver-based treatments. Doctors and hospitals already rely on an array of silver-infused medical products—from bandages to catheters—to prevent the proliferation of ­bacteria. The metal is commonly used on severe wounds, and coatings on door handles can cut down on germs. Consumers can even buy products to reduce unwanted microbes at home, like silver-infused socks and washing machines that disinfect clothes with silver.”Right now, the dominant idea is, if you want a certain lifetime of antibacterial performance, you have to engineer your device to sort of give off these ions over the full course of the time you want this activity,” says nanomaterials chemist Robert Hurt of Brown University, who was not involved in the research. But an understanding of the zombie effect could lead to better designs for such products, Hurt says. For example, engineers may now tailor their products to keep dead bacteria around, fortifying their antimicrobial powers and keeping germs at bay.Zombies might not be so bad after all.last_img read more

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