first_imgTottenham Hotspur’s slump continued as Leicester City beat them 2-1 on Tuesday with Jamie Vardy and Riyad Mahrez on target to avenge last season’s home mauling by the Londoners at the King Power stadium.Thrashed 6-1 by Mauricio Pochettino’s side in May, Leicester produced a performance more like that which took them to the Premier League title in 2015-16, leaving Spurs reeling after a third defeat in their last five league games.Vardy put the hosts ahead after 13 minutes, cleverly lobbing a volley over Tottenham goalkeeper Hugo Lloris after being put through by Marc Albrighton’s chipped pass.Spurs responded with Moussa Sissoko and Dele Alli having chances to equalise but were dealt a crushing blow on the stroke of halftime when Mahrez cut in from the right and sent a spectacular dipping effort into the top corner.Tottenham’s Argentine forward Erik Lamela came on for his first appearance in 13 months after injury and set up Harry Kane to smash home a late reply.Fellow substitute Fernando Llorente then squandered a glorious late chance to level for the visitors but Leicester held on for their first home win over Spurs since 2002.last_img read more

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first_imgDear Editor,I read a letter in the Guyana Times (Mon, July 18, 2016) titled “Good Samaritan leads the way in Region 5” by Harry Gill, Member of Parliament (PPP/C).Gill wrote that Nowrang Persaud with the blessings of the Guyana Post Office Corporation (GPOC) built a permanent shed with wooden benches for our pensioners to relax while they wait to uplift their pensions at the Blairmont Post Office.I think this is highly commendable by Nowrang Persaud which is an outstanding demonstration to show that pensioners, our senior citizens, need to be treated with respect and dignity, which is my opinion is sadly and generally lacking in our Guyanese society.MP Harry Gill seems to be responsible for Region 5, but I may have to ask him to also lobby the GPOC for a similar shed to be built at the Acquero Post Office in the Moruca sub-region of Region One where our Amerindian pensioners from distant communities have to wait (at times in vain) for extremely long hours and exposed to the sun and rain to uplift their ,000.I am impressed also with the representative actions of MP Harry Gill and the Good Samaritan demonstration by Nowrang Persaud. Let me kindly call on the Guyana Post Office Corporation (GPOC) General Karen Brown to have a waiting shed with benches built for the Moruca sub-region pensioners at the Acquero Post Office.However, if this is impossible then a Good Samaritan is also urgently needed in Region One (Moruca –sub Region). MP Harry Gill, can you please monitor this plea for help?Yours sincerely,Peter Persaudlast_img read more

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first_imgIt’s starting to be an anxious time for Los Angeles City Council leadership. Council President Eric Garcetti, winding up his first two-year term as head of the 15-member body, is looking over his shoulder for potential challengers. Garcetti, who succeeded former Councilman Alex Padilla by promising he’d allow other members to play a greater role, is particularly concerned at the prospect of a challenge by Councilman Herb Wesson. Wesson, a former state Assembly speaker who is no stranger to power politics, demurs on the subject but can’t help grinning at the possibility. It all started after Wesson said he will not run for Yvonne Burke’s seat on the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors and was happy being a member of the City Council. “I haven’t decided what I want to do,” Wesson said. “I’m not unhappy with Eric as president, but I have to say I don’t mind people thinking about me as running for mayor or council president. It makes them take you more seriously.” The council is set to elect its new leaders at the first meeting in July. While Garcetti is universally liked, some council members have confided that they are upset because he advances a personal political agenda on some issues – such as extending a “living-wage” ordinance to hotels near Los Angeles International Airport – that creates problems for them. Even if Wesson doesn’t challenge Garcetti for his post, conditions are ripe for the council to pull together a compromise slate. Signs are getting clearer on whom Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa plans to endorse in the U.S. presidential race. While he has been courted by all the major candidates, he has been the closest with the Clinton campaign – dining two weeks ago with the former president and Sen. Hillary Clinton while in New York City. Now there is word that one of Villaraigosa’s most-trusted political aides, Michael Trujillo, is going to work for Hillary Clinton as field director of her California campaign. It’s quite a move up for Trujillo, who got his start in politics as the youngest city commissioner ever under former Mayor Richard Riordan. Trujillo has held a variety of campaign posts and most recently managed the successful campaign of Los Angeles Unified School District board member Tamar Galatzan. If Villaraigosa is feeling picked on these days, he found some unlikely support from San Francisco publication Beyond Chron (www.beyondchron.org), which criticized a recent New Yorker profile of the mayor. Writer Randy Shaw compared the profile to a “Fox News `fair and balanced’ report on Barack Obama.” Shaw wrote that the New Yorker reporter only went to political enemies of the mayor and none of his friends. “The New Yorker profile is disturbing, due to the magazine’s widespread credibility, and raises questions as to why its top editors sacrificed this credibility by approving publication of (the reporter’s) deeply-flawed political attack,” Shaw wrote. LAUSD Superintendent David L. Brewer III is putting the finishing touches on his reorganization plan for the district. The plan is scheduled to be released June 14, but drafts of it so far have drawn an underwhelming response. One critic, who asked not to identified, said the plan does not look at key parts of LAUSD and has little focus on the two main issues facing the district: instruction and construction. rick.orlov@dailynews.com (213) 978-0390 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img
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first_imgAquarium official Minoru Toda said little has been known about the life of manta rays, and the record of the pregnancy and birth would provide valuable scientific data to the studies of the species. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! TOKYO – What is believed to be the first giant manta ray born in captivity has arrived at a southern Japanese aquarium, its keepers said Sunday. The baby manta, a female, was born late Saturday in a huge fish tank at the Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium, more than a year after its parents mated, according to a statement posted Sunday on the aquarium Web site. In a video capturing the birth, the baby manta, rolled up like a tube, came sliding out of the mother manta, then quickly spread its fins and began swimming around. The scene, recorded by the aquarium, was telecast by national broadcaster NHK on Sunday. Officials at the aquarium, which started raising manta rays in 1988, said they believe this is the first such birth in captivity. Noriyasu Suzuki, an official at the Izu-Mito Sea Paradise commercial aqua zoo in western Japan, also said he believes the birth in captivity is a world first. “I’ve never heard of any other case before,” he said. “Aquariums that raise manta rays are rare to begin with … because they get so big.” According to the aquarium, the newborn manta was more than 6 feet wide. The mother manta, which was brought to the aquarium in 1998 after hitting a fishnet off the southern island of Okinawa, about 1,000 miles southwest of Tokyo, mated with its partner on June 8, 2006, and was pregnant with the baby for 374 days, according to the Web statement. last_img read more

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first_imgSuspected burglarRe “UCLA receivers coach arrested by LAPD” (Sports, July 26″ (July 26):I am very disappointed to read about the arrest of UCLA Coach Eric Scott for burglary. I have been a UCLA fan since 1967, and I regret to say Scott failed UCLA when he chose not to disclose his arrest-and-conviction history during the employment-application process.Such an ethical lapse is reason enough for his firing. UCLA Athletic Director Dan Guerrero should do the right thing and terminate Scott’s contract immediately.– David CervantesLa Crescenta$1 trillion valueRe “County property values top $1 trillion” (July 10):When you see the graffiti on the walls, drive on the broken-up roads to the hospitals bursting at the seams and your children fail in the LAUSD schools, stop for a minute when you get the trash-fee increase, or the notice to replace your sidewalk from the city of L.A. How can the highest-paid city council with all the expensive lawsuits and welcoming more with their legislation, and scandals, manage so badly?The L.A. County tax assessor tells us the tax roll went up to $1 trillion after a $99888 billion increase this year and a further $94 billion increase the year before. Could it be the high salaries of the best-paid elected officials in the country?– Brian PaulWest Los AngelesLocking up LindsayRe “Brat” (July 25):I wrote several letters against the harsh treatment of Paris Hilton. Lindsay Lohan is a horse of a different color. This young girl is in serious self-destruct mode. As with the Paris letters, I disclose that I speak from experience. I spent time in a Los Angeles lockup myself. Lindsay needs a dose of this harsh reality before she kills herself or someone else.– Daniel HouyBurbankIraq is Bush’sRe “View From the Valley) (July 24):It’s obvious that Patrick O’Connor is a member of the 25 percent of Americans who don’t much care about America, only their Republican “team.” Although there are always people in both political parties who need skewering, it must be tough for you right now to close your eyes to what’s going on and find something to “pin the tail on the donkey.”But Iraq? Iraq was, is and always will be the sole fault of the Bush administration, which “fudged” us into war. Immigration? Whether the legislation was bad or good, the Republican president pushed for a bill that was supported by Democrats. And health care? Now, there you’re half right. We will likely never get the universal health care we deserve because certain members of both parties believe more in their right to make money than in the right for everyone to have access to a doctor.– Patrick TomcheckCulver CityParliament vacationThe Iraqi parliament decides to take a monthlong vacation in August, while our soldiers are dying there? Where are the expressions of outrage by our Congress and president at their lack of commitment and sense of urgency to solving their problems? And why are we so concerned about them, if they aren’t?– Harvey SeltzerWoodland HillsSowell’s facts wrongRe “Is U.S. becoming France of past?” (Their Opinions, July 26):Thomas Sowell says negotiations are bad, and will allow Iran to rise as Germany once did. The Germans did not universally approve of Hitler and not every German was a Nazi (only about 6 percent were card-carrying members). But as a country, they were united in opposing the humiliation of the Treaty of Versailles and the resulting ruin of their economy.So Sowell is right, but has the facts wrong: An occupying foreign power imposes a treaty (Big Oil gets Iraqi crude) that makes the country go broke and creates intolerable living conditions for the people, leaving the door open for a messianic leader (Iran) to create havoc against our interests. We are setting ourselves up for another war by not negotiating. If France had renegotiated Versailles, Hitler would have been swept aside.– Jerry P. ConchaSylmarRest of the storyRe “Very noble” (Your Opinions, July 24):Regarding a letter … that stated that the U.S. after war with Mexico “turned only half the country of Mexico back over to its own people” and “lost 500,000 square miles” – this is all true, but is not the whole story. Texas was already independent from Mexico, rightly or wrongly, beforehand.As to the rest, our government paid the Mexican government $15 million in compensation at the time. Granted, it was thus a forced sale and therefore not morally right, but it was not out and out thievery. Remember, that would be the equivalent of billions today. (Another $10 million was also paid a decade later for the purchase of southern Arizona.) But I would also like to ask, would our Southwest really be better off today if we were not part of the United States?– Mark BailieArletaA simple yesRe “Give him a chance (Your Opinions, July 24):To John J. Curti, who asks incredulously what poor Cardinal Mahony was to do when he discovered he was surrounded by pedophile priests, “Get rid of them?” The answer is a simple, resolute yes.That fact that he doesn’t know that reveals the true problem in today’s church. And by the way, a zygote isn’t a child, any more than a fertilized egg is a chicken. Like any business, the church just wants to grow its market share. God, save me from your followers.– Mark LawrenceLos AngelesDecent peopleThis is a thank-you letter to the gentleman who stopped to help out me and my family Thursday night. Our car had died at the corner of Foothill and Hubbard in Sylmar, and after several people honked and yelled at us, this gentleman and his family stopped to help us get our car safely to the curb so we could call for help.I unfortunately did not get his name, but I hope he reads this paper and recognizes himself. This just shows that there are still decent people around.– Becky ButlerSunlandRelief from livingIt’s amazing the outpouring of lament for the loss of our favorite comic strips. Perhaps it helps us to escape the reality of this world: war, political shenanigans, environmental disasters, crime and all other horrors.I’m concerned that newspaper reporting has become entertainment. Instead of front-page news about Paris Hilton and all the other misguided rich and famous, move the obituary column to the front page (with) each of the Southern California soldiers’ photos/bios who have died in Iraq or Afghanistan. These Americans deserve front-page coverage. The Daily News has been a good watchdog for local political situations so don’t slide into entertainment news. I vote to have Zippy returned!– Carla HenryWest HillsSpoiled bratRe “Brat” (July 25):Imagine my surprise when I opened Wednesday’s Daily News. I thought I was looking at the Enquirer or some other sleazy supermarket tabloid. With all of California’s scandalous religious (Mahony) or political (Villaraigosa, Delgadillo, Cedillo, etc.) news to report, I’m faced with all the sordid details of the drunken antics of another Hollywood spoiled brat.– Bob SullivanHidden Hills160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! One person, one voteRe “So who gets say in L.A.?” (July 9):Neighborhood councils will not be taken seriously until registered voters, as defined by the state, elect their boards. That “stakeholder” definition is good enough for City Council members; it should be good enough for neighborhood councils. The current and proposed definition of stakeholder allows people to vote in, and even sit on the boards of, multiple neighborhood councils. Whatever happened to one person, one vote?The 912 Commission’s “cure” for board takeovers, partitioning boards into stakeholder categories, causes voter confusion and poor turnout. It also often results in some seats remaining unfilled or being won with a single vote.– Clara WollChatsworth The people’s rightsRe “P.R. firm plans blitz for Home Depot site” (July 26):The people of California vote for legalized marijuana for the sick and the federal government refuses to recognize it; the residents of Sunland-Tujunga say no to a Home Depot and the city says “too bad.” Is it too late for the people to stand up and get their rights back?– Marty KleinNorth Hollywoodlast_img read more

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first_img“As a senator from a state where such disasters are far too common, I urge you to take immediate action to ensure that our National Guard is fully prepared to respond to domestic emergencies,” Boxer said. Wade, however, said the percentage of equipment in Iraq is small. The real problem, he said, is that the National Guard doesn’t have much equipment to begin with – and what it does have is out-of-date and in poor condition. “The war fight is not what concerns me,” he said. “We never had the equipment to begin with.” But Eric Lamoureux, spokesman for the Governor’s Office of Emergency Services, said the state is prepared to deal with any disaster. “The National Guard is certainly a significant asset, but they’re part of a larger tool box,” Lamoureux said, noting that the state can call upon police, fire and other disaster-response units from other states under mutual-aid agreements. As for the guard’s equipment shortfall, he said, “I don’t think it’s something that should alarm people.” lisa.friedman@langnews.com (202) 662-8731 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Deployment of California National Guard officers, trucks and equipment to Iraq has threatened the guard’s ability to respond to a major disaster in the state, acting U.S. Army Secretary Peter Geren has acknowledged. In a letter to California Sen. Barbara Boxer, Geren said the state has “adequate capability to respond to small and medium domestic missions.” But, he warned, “equipment shortages could potentially limit their capability to fully respond to large-scale emergencies such as a catastrophic earthquake or major flood.” Boxer released the letter Wednesday and lambasted President George W. Bush’s Iraq policies, saying the war had left Americans at risk at home. But California’s National Guard adjutant general, Major General William H. Wade, refuted the Army’s conclusions and said the state is fully prepared to respond to all types of disasters. “The National Guard has always been ready,” Wade said. “We have never failed to respond to any emergency. There are multiple resources that we can get and we will exercise every one of those if the need arises.” Congress has long questioned the domestic preparedness of the National Guard, particularly as a growing number of troops have been deployed to Iraq. As recently as May, the state National Guard warned that disaster response could be slower as a result. In California, about 3,600 National Guard officers are federalized, with about 1,400 serving in Iraq and the rest in Afghanistan, South Asia or various parts of the United States. In addition, about 200 pieces of California equipment are in Iraq, including Humvees, fuel trucks and cargo trucks. In a letter Wednesday to Bush, Boxer said she was alarmed by Geren’s letter. last_img read more

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first_img“I am going to come see you, the local district superintendents are going to come see you, the directors are going to come see you and when we come see you, we’re going to have a scorecard,” Brewer said. In his speech, Brewer eschewed notes and the lectern and paced confidently on stage like a motivational speaker as his “8 Steps to Change” reform plan was projected on two jumbo-size screens. Sense of urgency In a marked departure from predecessor Roy Romer’s style – which usually included cardboard charts of student test scores – Brewer forcefully prodded school leaders to establish a sense of urgency. He exhorted them to build their own teams, create a vision, communicate the vision, empower others to act, produce quick wins, not let up or give up, and create a new culture. And he emphasized that each administrator will undergo professional development courses that will guide reform along with data, innovation, engaging parents and the community and ensuring student safety. The goal, he said, is to create an environment that nurtures teachers such as Jaime Escalante, who defied expectations and taught advanced math classes to poor students at Garfield High School. Actor Edward James Olmos was nominated for an Oscar for his portrayal of Escalante’s challenges and triumphs in the 1988 film “Stand and Deliver.” But Escalante resigned in 1991 – after 17 years at Garfield – to take a teaching post in the Sacramento City Unified School District. “All I know is that we have not recovered from that at Garfield. … In this culture, we kill our savants. We have to stop that. That is a part of the cultural revolution that is going to happen under David Brewer,” he said. “We will not kill our savants. We will model them and benchmark what they’re doing and replicate what they’re doing.” State Superintendent of Public Instruction Jack O’Connell urged principals to continue to challenge students to higher achievement and to feel connected to their schools. “Our jobs have become more difficult because this is a new economy,” he said. “It’s a hyper-competitive global economy and it’s an economy that requires of all of us to have higher-level thinking skills and we need to impart that on our students.” Julie Korenstein, who has served on the school board for 20 years and has heard numerous back-to-school addresses, complimented Brewer’s style of speech but questioned its content. She said professional development courses are costly and may not be necessary for all administrators. “I don’t know whether or not what he is suggesting or recommending, where the teeth is in it yet,” she said. “These are a lot of hardworking administrators who have worked at their schools for a long, long time … I’m not sure if we need wholesale retraining of every administrator in the district.” Focus on students LAUSD spokeswoman Binti Harvey said Brewer will use existing funds to pay for the professional development, along with some corporate funding. For Jefferson High Assistant Principal Jose Avila, the message was clear: Focus on students and don’t deviate no matter how difficult it gets. “It was inspiring. I think it’s definitely the move that we need to make and the direction we need to take,” Avila said. “We have to focus on the child and every time that something becomes difficult, take a look at who our clients are – our children – and they’re the ones we’re here for. “They’re our customers and they’re the ones we have to serve.” naush.boghossian@dailynews.com (818) 713-3722 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Seeking to elevate performance at Los Angeles Unified schools, Superintendent David Brewer III said Friday that he will hold administrators accountable for the first time with new evaluations, dropout and test-score benchmarks, and districtwide reviews. In his first official back-to-school address to thousands of administrators, Brewer vowed a cultural revolution this year in the 708,000-student district. “Failure will no longer be an option at LAUSD,” he told nearly 2,000 principals, assistant principals and LAUSD administrators gathered at the Los Angeles Convention Center. Nearly 10 months after he took the helm of the nation’s second-largest school district, Brewer said new evaluation forms for administrators will take into account state testing performance, absentee rates and the number of ninth-graders moving to the 10th grade. And Brewer told teachers and administrators that despite the new benchmarks – and the difficulties ahead – they need to persevere. “When you feel like you want to give up, you look at a young child … to give yourself inspiration. You go out and look at some of these young people who are struggling every day walking through gang gantlets to get to school to get an education and then you say to yourself, `I will never give up,”‘ Brewer said. “When I have a bad day, I go visit a school because I have to be reminded viscerally what I’m all about, why I left my comfort zone to come here.” In a district where accountability has never been institutionalized, Brewer said directors will visit schools every month to monitor progress. The new evaluation forms, which have the support of the administrators union, will be formally introduced next year, Brewer said, but administrators will be targeted on the standards this year. last_img
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first_imgMovies Under the Stars, 7 p.m., Mason Recreation Center, 10500 Mason Ave., Chatsworth. Call (818) 998-6377. Josh Kelley, 8 p.m., Marie Kerr Park, Palmdale Amphitheater, 2723 Rancho Vista Blvd. Mail Datebook entries – including time, date, location and phone number – to Daily News City Desk, P.O. Box 4200, Woodland Hills, CA 91365; fax (818) 713-0058; e-mail dnmetro@dailynews.com.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! SATURDAY American Cancer Society Relay 4 Life, 9-10 a.m.today and Sunday, Highland High School, 39055 25th St. W., Palmdale. Call (661) 945-7585. Basketball Trophy Ceremony, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Winnetka Recreation Center, 8401 Winnetka Ave. Call (818) 756-7876. Latino Heritage Celebration, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Los Angeles Zoo, 5333 Zoo Drive, Los Angeles. Call (323) 644-4200. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREThe Christmas Truce of 1914 proved that peace is possibleOrchid Show and Sale, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. today, noon-3 p.m. Sunday, Thousand Oaks Library, 1401 E. Janss Road. Free. Call (805) 523-1857 or (818) 889-1895. Great Backbone Trail Celebration, 11 a.m., Peter Strauss Ranch. Kanan Road exit south to Mulholland Highway and Troutdale Road. Meet by the ranch house. Call (805) 370-2301. Gospel Festival, 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sports Center, 11770 Orcas Ave., Lake View Terrace. Membership Drive Fiesta, 2-5 p.m., Leonis Adobe Museum, 23537 Calabasas Road. Call (818) 222-6511. Ranger-led hike, 6-8 p.m., Deukmejian Wilderness Park Amphitheater, 3429 Markridge Road, La Crescenta. Call (818) 548-3795. last_img read more

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first_img 2 The 20-year-old left the pitch in some discomfort AFP or licensors According to Le Parisien, the 20-year-old will miss a month after undergoing tests at a hospital in the French capital.It means the forward will miss PSG’s Champions League group stage opener against Real this evening. Kylian Mbappe will miss Paris Saint-Germain’s Champions League showdown with Real Madrid tonight as he continues to recover from a tear in his thigh.The France forward was one of THREE players who left the field in agony in last month’s 4-0 win over Toulouse which has left Thomas Tuchel in the midst of an injury crisis. AFP or licensors Kylian Mbappe underwent tests at a Paris hospital, to determine he has a tear in his thigh Neymar is suspended tonight after insulting match officials last season while Cavani is also out injured and loan signing Mauro Icardi is lacking match fitness.Real also have issues to contend with as Marcelo, Luka Modric, Isco and Marco Asensio are injured and Nacho and Sergio Ramos are suspended.The blockbuster European tie will be live on talkSPORT 2. 2last_img read more

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