first_imgLike so many Indians in Berbice, I grew up in a home in which my parents never attended school beyond the age of twelve. My father, now deceased, was a proud sugarcane harvester while my mother was a reputable seamstress but both could not read or write. My parents relied on oral traditions to guide their day-to-day actions but they were not stupid people. They were simply uneducated. My mother can now read somewhat.Of the seven children my parents raised, three of them have PhDs, one has a MA, two barely finished high school, and one was pulled out of Form One to take care of the younger ones. The latter was my solitary sister and I am still mad at my parents for depriving her an education.My family story with regard to education in Guyana has another bizarre twist. None of us attended the University of Guyana. Actually, only two of us have visited the University of Guyana. Instead, some of us have earned degrees from University of Wisconsin, State University of New York, University of Winnipeg, Florida International, and Columbia University.Then why does the University of Guyana mean so much to me in particular? Or, why am I writing about the University of Guyana? It is this inward hunger to come back home and make up for lost ground through academic contribution. But I did not know where to start. When I told my Nigerian friend in graduate school that I planned to go back to Guyana to live and work he said to me why place unnecessary burden on your life.My goal of returning home began realistically when I ran into Dr Parsram Thakur at a conference in Suriname in 2004. I was then employed at the University of the Virgin Islands. I did not know Dr Thakur. I found out later that he and my mother were kindergarten playmates. Dr Thakur asked me to come and teach at the Berbice campus. I said I would in a few years.So far so good but in 2004 my father died suddenly in upstate New York. My elder brother, a Professor at Syracuse University, and I decided that in remembrance of our father we would set up a scholarship in his name at the Berbice campus. We did. However, the scholarship funds were abused and we pulled the plug on it. I doubt whether there is any record of this at the University of Guyana. It is sad, and in some ways, worse than my father’s death.In spite of this bad experience, I was in 2009 preparing to come to Guyana to work at Berbice campus under the leadership of Dr Thakur but then someone or group of people discontinued this man’s contract with the university. For years, I have tried to find out why and I have gotten nowhere. I even wrote a few letters to one of the dailies inquiring about his termination but it fell on deaf ears.In 2010, I called the University of Guyana at the Berbice campus and spoke to an individual named Daizal Samad. I expressed my interest in working on that campus and he advised me to send a cover letter and my CV. I did. For over eight months after submitting my information, I tried to contact this man and any time I called the answer from his secretary was that he was busy and he would get back to me. Whenever I was in Guyana in summer months I would stop in at the campus but he was never around. I decided to make one final call using a different phone. He picked up and after a few minutes he slipped into this “Corentyne Creole/dialect” actually downplaying my frustration.After all these months and almost a year he said I would have to apply to the University of Guyana at Turkeyen. I asked him to forward my application and he said he could not do that. I said to myself this man must be a moron of morons. I was right. A year later he was removed from the job.What is so bizarre about this experience is that I was going back home against the wishes of my family. I was also giving up an established faculty position at a reputable university in the US. What would have been encouraging to them more than me was that I was willing to accept whatever salary they were offering, which was, below expectations. I wonder how many other individuals have had the same nightmare experience like myself. (lomarsh.roopnarine@jsums.edu).last_img read more

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first_imgPresident David Granger extended Guyana’s gratitude to the Government and people of Canada for the firm support that country has shown in the face of the ongoing Guyana/Venezuela border controversy, even as heCanada High Commissioner to Guyana Pierre Giroux, and President David Granger share a toast in celebration of ‘Canada Day’ as well as the 50 years of friendship between the two countriescommitted to ensuring the bilateral ties between the two countries remain strong.The President made these comments during his address at a reception held to observe ‘Canada Day’ on Friday evening. The Head of State said that Guyana remains appreciative of the position, which has been taken by Canada to support Guyana’s stance on the ongoing border controversy.“Guyana applauds the consistently principled position that Canada has taken in defence of Guyana’s sovereignty and territorial integrity. Guyana welcomes and appreciates this approach, which is a manifestation of Canada’s interest in ensuring respect for the inviolability of international treaties, particularly here in the Western Hemisphere,” President Granger said.Canada’s support, the President said, is a testimony of the friendly and strong relations that exist between the two countries. He noted that ‘Canada Day’ could not have come at a more opportune time as Guyana and Canada are celebrating 50 years of bilateral ties, which he hopes will extend for a long time.“It is a happy occasion that this celebration is a coincidence. Not only is Guyana observing its 50th Anniversary of Independence, but 50 years of diplomatic relations with Canada… Relations between Guyana and Canada have been strengthened through increased technical cooperation, trade and development assistance…Canada has been an important ally of Guyana within the Commonwealth. Guyana looks forward to continued collaboration with Canada in international organisations,” President Granger said.He noted that Canadian companies are engaged in Guyana’s forestry and mining sectors and have brought considerable expertise and experience in the extractive industries.Further, Canadian markets are more accessible to Guyana’s goods under the preferential CARIBCAN trading arrangement and as such, “Guyana is keen to attract investments from Canada that will attract value to its exhaustible resources”.The President said too that Guyana is examining actively the proposal that has been made by Canada, for training and development and the country welcomes the offer of assistance for the setting-up of the Sovereign Wealth Fund (SWF). Meanwhile, Canadian High Commissioner to Guyana, Pierre Giroux remarked that Canada and Guyana share many common goals and characteristics as well as membership in many international organisations, which speak to the countries’ values and culture. “We have a long-standing trade relationship that goes back centuries and Canada is also one of the largest sources of foreign direct investment in Guyana. Canada and Guyana share a vision for a more secure and prosperous region, which is why Canada established the Caribbean Regional Development Programme…Canada and Guyana also share extensive people-to-people ties, with the Guyanese diaspora in Canada estimated to be around 200,000, linking our cultures and peoples ever closer,” High Commissioner Giroux said. The High Commissioner also said that Canada looks forward to growing together with Guyana for the next 50 years and beyond and “together, we will shape the future of our two great countries.”The event was also attended by First Lady Sandra Granger, other ministers of government, members of the National Assembly and the diplomatic corps.last_img read more

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first_imgVALENCIA – Bernardo Feldman remembers a time only a select few appreciated the electronic music genre, and as young composer Feldman knew, he was going against tradition. “It was radically different from what people knew as music – pop, jazz and orchestra,” Feldman said. “It was all about being anti-establishment.” Now the futuristic beats and sounds coined electronika have gradually made their way up the pop music charts. And this popularity has led the musical movement to the college classroom, with Santa Clarita’s College of the Canyons leading the way. Feldman, professor of the college’s first-ever electronic music for stage course, teaches his students about sequencing, sampling and synthesis technology – techniques increasing in popularity because entire albums can be composed and performed from a laptop computer. The college has been offering music technology courses, but dedicating an entire class to the development of electronic music for the stage is an innovative move, he said. “If we are not the first colleges in California to offer this class, we are one of a few,” Feldman said in an interview this week. “I am teaching these kids how to get up in front of a crowd and perform their sounds. They will have to find a way to make their movements on a keyboard interesting.” The class is a dream come true for Pejman Roozbek. As a child, Roozbek was captivated by the fast-paced thumps of digital noise. Then three years ago Roozbek enrolled into piano lessons and he realized two things. “I knew I wanted to make music for the rest of my life and I wanted to combine the traditional with electronic,” he said. In a performance Friday, Roozbek will play a piano solo into a special microphone that will instantaneously filter and synthesize the sound, distorting the traditional instrument’s melody. “It will be a combination of synthetic and organic sound,” he said. While electronic music is no longer such an obscure genre, there’s still some stigma, one student said. Akenaton Flores, 20, said he’s had to explain that his love for electronic music does not translate to a love of drugs. “A lot of people still associate electronic music with rave culture, with drugs like Ecstasy. But actually electronic music is about peace, love, unity and respect,” Flores said. “It’s about twisting sounds to create great music.” connie.llanos@dailynews.com (661) 257-5254160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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first_img Axelle Despiegelaere pictures – click the arrows to see more photos of the Belgian beauty 8 Belgium may have gone out of the World Cup at the quarter-final stage, but one Red Devil has become a winner in Brazil.Axelle Despiegelaere was spotted by L’Oreal and offered a modelling contract after becoming an online sensation thanks to pictures of her cheering on her nation, Belgium, in South America.Despiegelaere’s Facebook page has generated over 200,000 likes since being set up during the World Cup, while a video of her beauty tutorial for L’Oreal is close to two million views at time of writing…Perhaps she could give Marouane Fellaini some tips on how to do his hair? 8 Axelle Despiegelaere pictures – click the arrows to see more photos of the Belgian beauty 8 Axelle Despiegelaere pictures – click the arrows to see more photos of the Belgian beauty 8 8 Axelle Despiegelaere pictures – click the arrows to see more photos of the Belgian beauty Axelle Despiegelaere pictures – click the arrows to see more photos of the Belgian beauty 8 8 Axelle Despiegelaere pictures – click the arrows to see more photos of the Belgian beauty Axelle Despiegelaere pictures – click the arrows to see more photos of the Belgian beauty 8 Axelle Despiegelaere pictureslast_img read more

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first_imgBy Andrea Woodhouse STAFF WRITER For the first time in a long while, the air was still inside the North American Trisonic Wind Tunnel. Not a single breeze passed through the 500-foot-long tunnel, which is capable of generating wind speeds faster than three times the speed of sound. The tunnel’s landlord, UCLA, has opted to close the facility, mostly citing environmental concerns over previous PCB spills, said Brad Erickson, UCLA’s director of campus service enterprises. Original owner Rockwell International, formerly North American Aviation, donated the property to UCLA in 1998 for use as a university research facility, which never really materialized, Erickson said. Since then, Triumph Aerospace Systems has continued to operate the plant, paying rent and sharing profits with UCLA, Hughes said. With a 49-square-foot test section allowing for larger test models and letting engineers actually stand up, the Trisonic is unusually large, considering most tunnels have a 16-square-foot test area, Hughes said. “Boeing, Douglas and Lockheed all built smallish tunnels, and North American built a tunnel nearly twice as big,” he said. “It remains to this day unique in the size and performance.” But the tunnel’s real claim to fame is its ability to perform tests at up to 31/2 times the speed of sound, making nearby Northrop Grumman’s tunnel that hits about 100 mph look like an oscillating fan. Sans wind, the slick tunnel would make a dream playground for children, or an awesome skateboarding venue. On the tunnel’s northern end, its smooth steel walls lead through a pitch-black corridor, ending at a 28-foot-tall screen, from which the forceful gusts pass and voices cast echoes. The other side of the tunnel leads to a cement hall and a giant, curved grate that catches any flying objects and lets air pass through a vent. Circular holes cut into the “colander,” as Triumph employees call it, filter light through and provide an excellent grip for little hands, making for a fine jungle gym. The tunnel routinely blows about 1,300 hours a year, and in January alone clocked 300 hours, Hughes said. Tests cost $3,500 an hour, he said. And though the tunnel has been all business for the past 50 years – testing planes, rockets and bombs for aerospace giants, as well as the government and private companies like Cessna – Triumph’s remaining half-dozen employees have invited Trisonic veterans for a nostalgia-fest Saturday. A crew will spiff up the tunnel this week, making it clean and safe for former employees, vendors and old friends to walk the spans one last time, Hughes said. In tears off and on for the last few days, the Playa del Rey resident sent an emotional invitation to old friends: “Those of us who have worked here in the final generation of staff and crew feel that it has been the job of a lifetime – an honor and a privilege to have been part of the Trisonic Wind Tunnel story,” Hughes wrote. The Trisonic is the latest casualty in what industry insiders have called a “wind-tunnel crisis,” as high-capability tunnels are frequently scrapped, forcing rocket and plane manufacturers to go overseas for testing. About five years ago, Lockheed Martin dismantled its tunnel near Santa Clarita and sent it to Asia. NASA has shut down several tunnels, and Douglas Aircraft shuttered its facility in El Segundo in the mid-1980s, Hughes said. “Some of our customers are extremely upset,” he said. “They can get the same capability if they go to Europe or Russia. But they don’t want to do that, especially if they have secure projects.” A trend of outsourcing testing has contributed to the tunnels’ disappearance, exacerbated by the explosion of computer technology, Hughes said. “Computer prediction is sexy,” he said. “Simulation is not as sexy.” But the accuracy from a wind tunnel cannot be beat, said longtime employee Gary Wilhelm. “Computers have not come close to this,” he said, adding that his 34 years working at the tunnel have been “more than fun.” UCLA has still not decided what to do with the land, Erickson said Friday. Environmental remediation is a must, but the university has been approached by the federal government for a possible sale and is open to salvaging materials, he said. As the South Bay says goodbye to the antique facility, a remaining nod to the area’s aerospace heyday of the 1950s, Triumph employees are busy looking for new jobs. But Hughes, a native of England, said Friday he didn’t have final plans yet, as he toured the facility with the look of a proud father in his deep blue eyes. “It’s just such neat stuff,” he said. andrea.woodhouse@dailybreeze.com160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! And the air was thick and heavy Friday – possibly from the stubborn late-summer heat, or maybe from sadness as the few lingering employees at the landmark El Segundo facility prepare to close up shop this month for good. “It’s very sad for anyone involved in this tunnel,” said Rick Hughes, the facility’s director of operations. “It’s just so unique. We love to show it off, but it’s in very sad shape right now.” Using the same technology and equipment as it did on its first run 50 years ago, the tunnel performed its 807th – and final – test Aug. 29, Hughes said. The past two weeks have been filled with writing final reports, last-minute archiving and impromptu visits from old employees nostalgic for one last look at a facility that through the years tested high-profile projects like the Apollo space program and XB-70 supersonic airplane. “This was the first generation of big, supersonic wind tunnels,” Hughes said. last_img read more

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first_imgLiverpool have reportedly launched a club record bid for Monaco midfielder Thomas Lemar.The 21-year-old has been the subject of interest from Arsenal all summer, but Gunners boss Arsene Wenger last week insisted that deal was dead.But now, according to French newspaper L’Equipe, Liverpool are ready to enter the race for Lemar’s signature with an initial offer of £66million, rising to a possible £74m with add-ons.If the Reds are successful with their offer, it would smash their transfer record of £39m which they broke earlier this summer when they signed Mohamed Salah from Roma.And if the deal is done, it is likely to re-ignite Barcelona’s interest in Philippe Coutinho. Thomas Lemar 1last_img

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first_imgKris Commons wants a quick resolution to his future after his loan spell at Hibernian from Celtic came to an end.The 33-year-old scored the winner for Neil Lennon’s side in a 1-0 win over Dumbarton on Saturday, marking what could be his final appearance for the Easter Road club as they stretched their lead at the top of the Scottish Championship.But Commons admitted after the match that he would like to play an even bigger part in Hibernian’s promotion push, confirming that he will speak to Celtic next week.“What will happen? Who knows? Celtic are coming back after a sunny break in Dubai so I’ll be touching base with them,” Commons told national newspapers. “Hopefully we can resolve something sooner rather than later. It would be good to be going for championships and winning trophies. “If I can be a part of that it will be great not only for Neil but myself. I need to speak to Celtic first and foremost about their situation regarding myself and then options will probably come along.”last_img read more

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first_imgCBM Signs are a nationwide Sign & Branding company based in Letterkenny.From our Letterkenny office; we design, print & fit all types of bespoke signs & branding Nationwide. Due to expansion, we are currently seeking to recruit a full-time Sign Maker & Print Finisher.The Sign Maker & Print Finisher’s main duties will include: preparing & finishing signs, ready for collection & delivery, assessing & reporting on stock levels and servicing printers. As you progress in the role you will be fully trained in wide format printing. The ideal candidate should have/be:• Systems driven & organised.• A willingness to learn.• Able to work as part of a team.• A good eye for detail & quality control.• Able to work to deadlines.• An excellent record in customer service.• Willing to Learn and Develop New Skills.Comprehensive in-house training will be provided.CBM Signs welcome all applications and ask that applicants submit their CV together with a short cover letter explaining why they are applying for the position by email to aoibhinn@boydhr.ie Closing date is 5pm, Friday, May 12th 2017All applications will be dealt with promptly and in the strictest of confidence.CBM Signs is an equal opportunities employer.Job Vacancies: CBM Signs seek graphic designers and print finisher was last modified: May 10th, 2017 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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first_imgThe final report into the disappearance of MH370 issued by Malaysia is not final for the relatives, the aviation industry or the conspiracy theorists.It is just the beginning of a new phase of the search into the most bizarre disappearance of modern history.The 495-page report is comprehensive but despite the pages of detail the authorities are “unable to determine the real cause for the disappearance of MH370.”It is a great shame that all the Malaysian authorities responsible for the aviation industry in March 2014 were not as thorough when MH370 disappeared.At the time of the disappearance, the Malaysian oversight of its airline industry was only 30 percent compliant with international standards.Read: Families disappointed in the MH370 report.It was as though everyone was asleep at the wheel on that haunting Saturday morning.Fighters should have been scrambled to follow MH370 as has been done many times around the world – including Australia – when a plane goes “silent.”The report raises the issue of the captain’s flight simulator but in stark contrast to the Australian Transport Safety Bureau report backs away from any connection to the events of MH370.The Malaysian report says that the Royal Malaysian Police Forensic Report concluded: “that there were no unusual activities other than game-related flight simulations.”However, the ATSB said that “six weeks before the accident flight the Pilot in Command had used his simulator to fly a route, initially similar to part of the route flown by MH370 up the Strait of Malacca, with a left-hand turn and track into the southern Indian Ocean.”The Malaysian report does, however, point the finger at human intervention.It says that the aircraft was under manual control not autopilot when it made the various turns and that it could not be established whether the aircraft was flown by anyone other than the pilots.The Malaysians also agree with the ATSB that at the end of the flight the plane was in a dive with no-one on control with the aircraft’s flaps retracted rather than a pilot controlled soft ditching on the ocean as suggested by some.It also states that some of the debris that was found was almost certainly from the interior of MH370 indicating a violent impact.It is certain that this report is not the end and hopes are high within the industry that US-based Ocean Infinity will resume that search for MH370 later in the year – possible just outside the areas of greatest interest as identified by the ATSB, CSIRO, UWA and the Independent Group.last_img read more

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first_imgThe goals and benefits of true Enterprise Search still elude most organizations.   While Enterprise Search technology has made big strides over the last decade, most organizations either don’t use it or have introduced implementations that reach only into collaborative systems and the corporate intranet.  Surprisingly, a report by Forrester shows that of organizations using Enterprise Search only half have included content management systems and file shares in the realm of searchable data, and only 18 percent of organizations have included line-of-business applications as searchable content.  You might well ask then, what’s the point of implementing Enterprise Search?The Forrester report shows that even in 2010 Knowledge Workers continue to complain that within their organizations that they are only able to find the information and documents that they are looking for about 50 percent of the time.  Many workers report that they prefer to search the Internet for information relevant to their job rather than use their internal search tools because it tends to be quicker and return relevant data more often.  Only 22 percent of workers say that they are using their company’s internet for finding and retrieving “team-only content”.Forrester found that employees at large companies (>5000 employees) use enterprise search 30+ percent times more frequently than employees of smaller companies, but interestingly, both groups report spending significant amounts of time searching for information to perform their job.  Larger companies have more resources to build out the infrastructure needed for Enterprise Search, but even with Enterprise Search tools available, search continues to be a bottleneck for people to effectively do their job.Not including all data stores into the range over which Enterprise Search can reach is one problem that impedes the effectiveness of search.  But there are also other problems that include out-of-date content and lack of information governance.  And perhaps the biggest roadblock to improvement is that many companies have still not made searchability of information in the enterprise a top priority.  While optimizing the findability of outward-facing web page data (SEO) is big business that many companies allocate large portions of their budget for, most companies do nothing to try to improve the findability of data within their organizations. Enterprise Search and Taxonomy projects are often at much lower priorities compared to other IT initiatives.  When IT managers were asked to rank the importance of various types of IT projects, Enterprise Search consistently ranked low.So the problem may not be one so much related to issues in the technology.  Organizations needs to become better aware of the benefits that good search tools and information governance would have on both employee productivity and quality of work, and they need to make search a higher priority in their organizations.  And Knowledge Workers need to bring this to the attention of their employers.last_img read more

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