first_imgWe are young Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. BREAKING: Solicitor General asks SC to forfeit ABS CBN’s franchise Clemente, a longtime Hall of Famer for the Pirates, died on New Year’s Eve in 1972 while on a charter plane that crashed after takeoff. The plan was carrying relief aid to Nicaragua following an earthquake.“What Roberto Clemente stood for, his family is living proof of what it was to not only be a professional athlete, but professional human being,” Granderson said. “The importance of knowing that his community is what made him who he was, and the reason why he was able to be where he was, and he never forgot that, whether his community was in Pittsburgh, where he played, or his hometown where he was able to go back to in the offseason, or during the season to help out at any time no matter what was going on.”Granderson is the fourth player from the Mets to win the award, joining Gary Carter (1989), Al Leiter (2000) and Carlos Delgado (2006). Pirates outfielder Andrew McCutchen was recognized last year.ADVERTISEMENT View comments EDITORS’ PICK Read Next “It’s really cool to get a chance to be here with my mom and dad, who made me who I am today,” he said. “Chicago’s always been home. Though I’ve played for teams outside of Chicago, but this is what helped me to get me where I am today.”The 35-year-old Granderson helps run baseball clinics and character development programs through the Grand Kids Foundation, which he created in 2007. He made a $5 million donation to UIC for the construction of indoor/outdoor baseball facility that opened in 2014.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSCone plans to speak with Slaughter, agentThe three-time All-Star also helps raise money for several charities in New York and has been active with the Mets’ military appreciation work.“He really is a deserving recipient of this great award,” Commissioner Rob Manfred said. Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH 30 Filipinos from Wuhan quarantined in Capas MOST READ Team ‘Trabaho’ scores championship title at the last leg of Smart Siklab Saya Manila BREAKING: Solicitor General asks SC to forfeit ABS CBN’s franchise Brad Pitt wins his first acting Oscar as awards get underway New York Mets’ Curtis Granderson smiles at a news conference as he receives the 2016 MLB Roberto Clemente Award before Game 3 of the Major League Baseball World Series Friday, Oct. 28, 2016, in Chicago. APCHICAGO — Winning the Roberto Clemente Award meant a lot to Curtis Granderson. Accepting the honor in front of his parents in his hometown made the moment even sweeter for the New York Mets outfielder.Granderson received baseball’s biggest honor for sportsmanship and community involvement before Game 3 of the World Series on Friday night at Wrigley Field. Granderson is from the Chicago suburb of Blue Island and played college ball at the University of Illinois-Chicago.ADVERTISEMENT 76ers apologize for canceling ‘We Matter’ anthem singer Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Ginebra teammates show love for Slaughterlast_img read more

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first_imgBali Pure captain Kaylee Manns said their main objective was to stop Alyssa Valdez from going into an offensive groove and she admits it wasn’t the easiest of jobs to pull off.“It was really hard but we calmed down,” said Manns. “We’re working on timing [Valdez’ shots]. We have to minimize her points and I think we did that today.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSCone plans to speak with Slaughter, agentValdez finished with 15 points while BOC import Kanjana Kuthaisong added 10.Amy Ahomiro had 13 points for Bali Pure. We are young BREAKING: Solicitor General asks SC to forfeit ABS CBN’s franchise No sweep as Ateneo deals La Salle first loss in UAAP Season 79 Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netBali Pure opened the semifinals of the Shakey’s V-League Reinforced Conference with a quick sweep of Bureau of Customs, 25-19, 25-18, 25-21, Saturday at Philsports Arena.Katherine Morrell led the Water Defenders with 20 points as they take a 1-0 lead in their best-of-three series against the Transformers.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ PH among economies most vulnerable to virus Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH 30 Filipinos from Wuhan quarantined in Capas Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Brad Pitt wins his first acting Oscar as awards get underway Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports BOC was at the constant mercy of Bali Pure’s attacks as the Water Defenders scored on 42 spikes compared to the Transformers’ 28.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next EDITORS’ PICK Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND View commentslast_img read more

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first_imgF2 Logistics. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netRiding on a three-game winning streak, F2 Logistics has emerged as the hottest team in the league after a run highlighted by an upset of erstwhile unbeaten Foton.F2 coach Ramil de Jesus said the desire to win comes from the players themselves. And it showed.ADVERTISEMENT 30 Filipinos from Wuhan quarantined in Capas Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes Russian coaches to help train Pinoys Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town PH among economies most vulnerable to virus Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports MOST READ Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH We are young Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine EDITORS’ PICK View comments As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise The three-time champion Lady Troopers hope to come out strong against the star-studded F2 cast, who are led by imports Hayley Spelman and Sydney Kemper, offense threats Ara Galang and Cha Cruz, and  block specialists Aby Maraño and Mika Reyes. Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next “We’re not doing anything special, they (players) just told me that they wanted to win,” said De Jesus. “So I’m doing my best in guiding them to achieve that goal.”That spells trouble for struggling RC Cola-Army when they clash at 6 p.m. today in the Asics-Philippine Superliga Grand Prix at Gen. Trias Sports Center in Cavite.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSCone plans to speak with Slaughter, agentFoton collides with Cignal in the opener at 4 p.m.“Although we don’t have a chance for the third spot anymore, we will still do our best to win over F2 Logistics [and Cignal this week] to gain momentum in the playoffs,” said RC Cola-Army coach Kungfu Reyes. last_img read more

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first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by John Cannon Animals, Conservation, Ecology, Environment, Fishing, Government, Mammals, Marine Animals, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Conservation, Marine Mammals, Oceans, Whales, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation center_img The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) recorded 76 whale entanglements in U.S. waters in 2017.Floating fishing gear and other trash in the sea can impede a whale’s ability to feed and swim.Humpback were most often seen entangled; historically, the species usually accounts for about two-thirds of reports in a given year.Despite North Atlantic right whales only having been involved in two known entanglements in 2017, scientists say that any run-in with gear or trash threatens the recovery of the species, which now numbers around 450 animals. The number of whales ensnared in fishing nets and other debris in U.S. waters didn’t change much between 2016 and 2017, according to a report by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) released in early December.Humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) were the species that most often turned up entangled, NOAA experts said in a teleconference on Dec. 6, probably because they swim close to shore where struggling whales can be most easily spotted.A team works to remove fishing gear from a whale. Image by Michael Dawes via Flickr.The report, published annually, lays out the numbers of entangled whales in 2017, as well as their species, where they were spotted and what snagged them. The authors also tried to determine the fisheries and parts of the country that were the sources of the gear that ended up entangling whales. More than two-thirds of the 76 documented cases of entanglement in 2017 involved nets, traps and other gear used by commercial or recreational fishermen.The Northeast and Mid-Atlantic, the West Coast and Alaska saw decreases in entanglements compared to 2016, while reports increased in Hawaii and remained steady in the South Atlantic region.Scientists figure that when a whale gets tied up in ropes, lines and floating trash, it’s likely to die unless it gets help, said Sarah Wilkin, who coordinates NOAA’s response to strandings and entanglements. Tangling with fishing nets and lines can impede a whale’s ability to move in the water, thwarting its ability to find the tons of food necessary to maintain its bulk.A humpback whale entangled in a net. Image by Michael Dawes via Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0).That’s especially concerning for the North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis), an IUCN-listed endangered species. There were only two cases of entanglement for the species in U.S. waters in 2017. But mid-year, NOAA announced a still-active marine mammal “unusual mortality event” for the species, and 17 would die over the course of the year. In Canadian waters, researchers suspect that five died as a result of their injuries from fishing gear in 2017, according to the report.“Given the endangered status of North Atlantic right whales — recent population estimates indicate only about 450 individuals remain —and declining trend of the species, any entanglement is a major threat to their recovery,” the authors wrote.The population of right whales off the East Coast of the U.S. appears to have plateaued in recent years, after the species came back from a low point of 270 animals in 1990. The animal’s stagnating recovery, even amid the surge in efforts to rescue entangled whales and avoid their contact with gear in the first place, has perplexed scientists.A disentanglement training exercise in Hawaii. Image courtesy of Coast Guard News via Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0).Recent research suggests that towing around gear could be hampering female right whales’ ability to maintain their weight and carry a fetus to term. More than 80 percent of right whales come in contact with fishing gear at some point in their lives.The North Atlantic Right Whale Consortium, a group of researchers, conservationists, and representatives of government agencies and industry, reports that there have been no recorded births in 2018 and that the number of right whales could be as few as 411.Eleven entangled gray whales (Eschrichtius robustus) were spotted in 2017, “much higher” than the average of just over six per year, according to the report.“The increase in entangled gray whales may suggest the animals overlapped with West Coast fishing efforts more than usual in 2017 during their annual migrations,” the authors write.Two other species, the minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) and the humpback, have also been stranding and dying at alarming rates lately.A  North Atlantic right whale towing a fishing rope. Image courtesy of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, taken under NOAA research permit #15488 via Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0).While it’s difficult to say whether entanglement causes stranding, “There is some overlap in that we get whales that are stranded and entangled,” Wilkin said. But in general, more whales strand than are confirmed to have been entangled in a given year, she added.NOAA’s Large Whale Entanglement Response Network addressed 50 of the entanglements in 2017, freeing — at least partially — 25 of the whales they went after.The network comprises a highly trained crew, and while NOAA says it depends on boaters to report sightings of distressed whales, the agency cautions members of the public against trying to help the whales.“Large whales are the largest animals on Earth, and disentangling them is inherently dangerous,” the report writers said. “Only trained and permitted responders should attempt to disentangle or closely approach an entangled large whale.”NOAA warns the public not to try to disentangle whales. The agency has regional hotlines to report sightings. Image courtesy of NOAA.Banner image of a humpback whale by Michael Dawes via Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0). Clarification: This article was amended on Dec. 20 to reflect the ongoing nature of the unusual mortality event that NOAA announced in 2017 for the North Atlantic right whale. The article also misstated the span of time during which 17 right whales died. That period was 2017, not late 2016 through 2017.CitationCooke, J.G. (2018). Eubalaena glacialis. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2018: e.T41712A50380891. Downloaded on 18 December 2018.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

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first_imgEcology, Environment, Environmental Policy, Fish, Marine, Marine Animals, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Conservation, Marine Crisis, Marine Ecosystems, Microplastics, Oceans, Plastic, Pollution, Recycling, Sea Turtles, Sustainability, Waste, Water Pollution, Wildlife Conservation Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored In January, the Flipflopi, a boat built of recycled plastic, set sail on a 500-kilometer (310-mile) voyage along the East African coast.The purpose? To raise awareness about ocean pollution and call for the repurposing of, and a possible ban on, single-use plastics.Globally, research on and attention to marine plastic pollution is mounting, showing that microplastics travel up the food chain, and that marine life and people alike are being exposed to microplastics through their food. WATAMU, Kenya — One Saturday mid-morning in late January, close to 100 people descended on the narrow streets of Watamu village along Kenya’s north coast to clean up the streets.Local beach cleaners in their white and blue T-shirts, children in school uniforms and ordinary villagers defied the sweltering heat. They picked up plastic bottles, bags and wrappers; glass bottles; old clothes and other litter from doorsteps, alleys, hedges, tree branches, gaping manholes and abandoned houses. By the time they approached the Watamu beach more than three hours later, they had collected tons of plastics.Despite being sweaty and tired, the children still had energy to play. They sorted the different types of plastics and used them to create images of marine life on the sandy beach. The plastics were later taken away to a local organization for recycling into construction bricks and works of art.Watamu school children help clean their village. Image by Anthony Langat for Mongabay.Just off the beach bobbed the Flipflopi, a colorful 10-meter-long (33-foot-long) boat built exclusively out of recycled plastics. Its multicolored hull, clad in patches made from discarded flip-flops, set it apart from the other boats nearby. Its builders cum crew sat aboard offering short rides and explaining its materials, building process, strength and stability at sea to groups of curious visitors, who were ferried from shore by a smaller boat.The Flipflopi had set sail from the town of Lamu a day before, embarking on a 14-day, 500-kilometer (310-mile) expedition along the East African coast to Stone Town in Zanzibar, Tanzania. The purpose of the voyage was to show the possibilities of recycling single-use plastics and to educate people on the effects of marine plastic pollution.The plastic problem in Watamu, a popular tourist destination, reflects the situation not only in Africa but also globally. In a 2017 paper in Science Advances researchers estimate that as of 2015 the world was producing 400 million metric tons of plastics annually and discarding 300 million metric tons. A 2017 study in Environmental Science & Technology estimated that 88 to 95 percent of plastic pollution in the oceans comes from just 10 rivers, eight in Asia and two in Africa.Garbage, mainly plastics, collected during the Watamu village cleanup. Image by Anthony Langat for Mongabay.Plastics choke Kenyan marine lifeThe Tana is Kenya’s longest river, flowing about 1,000 kilometers (620 miles) from the central part of the country to the Indian Ocean, enough distance to collect tons of plastics. It empties into the sea about 45 kilometers (28 miles) northeast of Watamu.In a study published last year, Charles Kosore, a researcher at the Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute in Mombasa, documented the presence of microplastics in Kenyan waters and their ingestion by zooplankton, tiny microscopic animals. It found that “microplastics have the potential to enter pelagic food webs and cause pollution in the study area.”Globally, research on and attention to marine plastic pollution is mounting, showing that microplastics travel up the food chain, and that marine life and people alike are being exposed to microplastics through their food. A doctoral student at the University of Bern in Switzerland calculated that plastic pollution causes $13 billion in financial damages to marine ecosystems per year, according to World Finance magazine.Hassan Shaffir, a fisherman and boat builder from Lamu, aboard the FlipFlopi in Watamu, Kenya. Image by Anthony Langat for Mongabay.Kenyan fishers are certainly aware of the cost. Hassan Shaffir, a fisherman from Lamu, said plastics in the ocean have made him poorer in recent years. While fishing at sea, Shaffir said, he and his colleagues regularly encounter long rows of plastics dumped in by the rivers. These break their fishing nets, requiring repairs that cost money and take valuable time away from fishing.“There are a lot of plastics in the sea and for those of us who fish using nets, we find it harder to catch fish,” he said. “If the plastic bottle attaches to the net it makes a sound, frightening the fish and instead of catching fish we catch plastic.”Shaffir added that the fish eat plastic, mistaking it for food. Mohamed Ali, a Watamu fisherman, observed the same. “The most affected are the sea turtles,” he said. “We find that they are mostly choked by the plastics, which they find at sea.”Jane Gitau, a senior warden with Kenya Wildlife Service in charge of Watamu Marine National Park and Reserve, acknowledged the problem. “We have seen deaths of endangered species, particularly the sea turtle,” which sometimes mistakes plastics for jellyfish, its main food, she said. “We have collected many carcasses of sea turtles due to this problem.”A Watamu resident during the village cleanup. Image by Anthony Langat for Mongabay.A boat made of flip-flopsThe Flipflopi’s builders aim to show that recycling can help clean the seas. But, they say, a ban on single-use plastics is what’s needed to put an end to ocean plastic pollution.“We all know that we have reached a tipping point,” Dipesh Pabari, one of the project’s initiators, told Mongabay. “There has to be change. You’ve got the waste that exists and there is too much of it. And we can put it to a second life but ultimately we have to find a way to end it.”The Flipflopi is the brainchild of Ben Morison, an Anglo-Ethiopian who spent his early years in Kenya. Seeing a small dhow made of flip-flops in Zanzibar inspired him to build his own boat out of plastics. Together with Pabari, his Kenyan childhood friend, he set out to achieve the dream in 2015.It wasn’t easy building the boat. “A lot of research and development went into the design of the materials, some of which were made in Malindi [a town near Watamu] and others in Nairobi,” said Pabari.The Flipflopi under sail from Watamu to Kilifi, Kenya. Image by Anthony Langat for Mongabay.They sent samples of the materials, molded bricks or planks made from compressed bottles and other plastics, to Northumbria University in England for tests several times until they arrived at a desired combination of strength and weight. It took three years to complete the boat because they were doing everything for the first time.Ali Skanda, Flipflopi’s chief boat builder and captain, was ecstatic about having completed the boat and being able to sail it. “It is my hope that with this boat we are going to inspire more people to stop littering and start recycling plastics so that we can have a cleaner ocean for everyone,” he said.The United Nations Environment Programme sponsored the Flipflopi’s Lamu-to-Zanzibar expedition through its Clean Seas Campaign. Between stops on the voyage, passengers collected samples of sea water to be analyzed later for microplastics, macrofibers and microfibers.“We have got various kinds of scientific equipment and a lot of it is for citizen science, the results of which we will make available to the world,” said Simon Scott-Harden, a lecturer in product design at Northumbria University who oversaw the sampling. “We are very interested to find out about the microfibers that we find in the ocean … This comes from clothing and it is a big problem that we need to address,” he said.Art works made of flipflops at the Watamu Marine Association office. In the background, recycled bottles are visible as a component of the office walls. Image by Anthony Langat for Mongabay.While most African countries recycle plastics, they don’t do it on a scale big enough to curb pollution. In 2015, South Africa, one of the biggest economies in Africa, recycled approximately 293,000 metric tons through more than 200 recycling companies.Kenya has far fewer companies recycling plastics. There are organizations like EcoPost, which makes recycled-plastic lumber; Ocean Sole, which turns old flip-flops into art and functional products; and Alternative Energy Systems, which converts waste plastic into fuels like synthetic oil. In 2018, a non-profit called PETCO Kenya launched to promote recycling of plastic bottles; it has the modest goal of recycling 14,000 tons by 2025.Steve Trott, director of Ecoworld, the Watamu Marine Association’s plastic recycling project, holds a discarded bottle at the organization’s collection yard. Image by Anthony Langat for Mongabay.EcoWorld, a Watamu-based project whose members and employees helped out with the cleanup, collects plastics from the beach and major tourist hotels and recycles them into construction bricks and art materials. The project is planning to expand its operations to more towns along the Kenyan coast. “We would like to collect more plastics because the companies that we sell to for further recycling have the capacity to recycle as much as we can offer,” said Steve Trott, EcoWorld’s director.For her part, park warden Gitau called for an increase in the recycling of plastics in the region. “The more we recycle means less plastics getting into the ocean and we will have a clean sea and healthy fish,” she said.Trash clutters the shore of Mombasa, Kenya. The Flipflopi made a stopover in Mombasa and other coastal towns on its voyage from Lamu, Kenya, to Zanzibar, Tanzania. Image by Anthony Langat for Mongabay.Anthony Langat is a Kenyan freelance journalist who writes about climate change, the environment, development and human rights. He contributes to Mongabay, Al Jazeera, Devex, Thomson Reuters Foundation, and Equal Times among other publications. CitationsGeyner, R., Jambeck, J.R., Lavender Law, K. (2017). Production, use, and fate of all plastics ever made Science Advances Vol. 3, no. 7, e1700782.Schmidt, C., Krauth, T., Wagner, S. (2017). Export of Plastic Debris by Rivers into the Sea. Environmental Science & Technology 51(21), 12246-12253.Kosore, C., Ojwang, L., Maghanga, J., Kamau, J., Kimeli, A., Omukoto, J., Ngisiag’e, N., Mwaluma, J., Ong’ada, H., Magori, C., Ndirui, E. (2018). Occurrence and ingestion of microplastics by zooplankton in Kenya’s marine environment: first documented evidence. African Journal of Marine Science 40:3, 225-234, DOI: 10.2989/1814232X.2018.1492969FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Article published by Rebecca Kesslerlast_img read more

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first_imgAmazon Conservation, Amazon Mining, Amazon Rainforest, Endangered Environmentalists, Forests, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Rights, Rainforest People, Rainforests, Tropical Forests Article published by Genevieve Belmaker Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img The Waorani indigenous community in Ecuador’s Amazon rainforest filed a lawsuit against three government bodies earlier this year for conducting a faulty consultation process in 2012 that resulted in putting their territory up for an international oil auction.A regional court tribunal ruled in favor of the community, saying the 2012 consultation process violated the community’s rights.The ruling is historic, as it gives communities an extra legal tool to demand their right to self-determination and opens the door to reshape the country’s free, prior and informed consent laws. QUITO, Ecuador — The indigenous Waorani community in Ecuador won a historic lawsuit against the government late last month, when a three-judge panel ruled that a consultation process conducted with the community in 2012 was inadequate and violated the community’s rights.The ruling immediately suspends any possibility of selling the community’s territory for the sake of oil extraction. The lawsuit represents 16 Waorani communities who live deep in Ecuador’s southern Amazon rainforest, in an area that has long been part of the government’s oil development plans.“Today, we have protected our forest from oil drilling, we have protected our water from contamination, we have protected our children from sickness,” said Oswando Nenquimo, spokesperson for the Waorani of the province of Pastaza, in an April 26 press release.But April’s ruling is more than just a win for the Waorani. It also sets an important precedent for other indigenous communities in the Amazon fighting against extraction activities in their territory, and opens the door to reshape the country’s controversial free, prior and informed consent process.The trial against free, prior and informed consentIndigenous Waorani marching to the judicial office Friday April 26 to hear the ruling for their lawsuit against the government. Photo by Mitch Anderson/Amazon Frontlines.The Waorani community co-filed the lawsuit earlier this year with the Ecuadoran Human Rights Ombudsman against three government bodies — the Ministry of Energy and Non-Renewable Natural Resources, the Secretary of Hydrocarbons, and the Ministry of Environment — for conducting a faulty consultation process with the communities in 2012.The state then proceeded to divide the southern Amazon into 13 blocks and put them up for sale in an international oil auction, called the Southeast Oil round. This includes Block 22, which overlaps almost entirely with Waorani territory. Last year, the government significantly reduced the auction down to two blocks and removed Block 22; but it emphasized that the region is not exempt from future drilling plans.According to both national and international law, governments must undergo a free, prior and informed consent (FPIC) process with communities before undergoing extraction activities on or near their territory.Waorani celebrate their win in the court room after the judge read a verdict for nearly 6 hours, and ruled in favor of the community. Photo by Mitch Anderson/Amazon Frontlines.During the three-day trial in April, the Waorani presented a wide range of evidence to show how the consultation process undertaken in 2012 was deceitful and not in accordance with legal standards in many ways. The evidence they presented included government documents, testimonies from experts as well as witnesses from the community.There were more than 50 testimonies by Waorani community members who said officials used the consultation process to promote the economic benefits of oil, but never explained the repercussions or environmental impacts of oil extraction in their territories. Others said they simply did not understand the consultation process or its implications, either from lack of translation into Waorani or a general lack of information.The ruling went on for almost six hours, as the judges went through each piece of evidence and explained how the consultation process in 2012 was inadequate, not conducted in good faith, and did not take into account the Waorani’s cultural differences and communication needs. It also said the consultation process violated the community’s right to self-determination.The regional court then ordered the state to undergo capacity training and apply internationally approved standards to all consultation processes, and redo the 2012 consultation process before trying to sell Waorani territory.“We are really satisfied with the court’s decision, especially because the court recognized that what happened in 2012, and what the state calls a ‘consultation’ never was,” said Lina Maria Espinosa, the community’s lawyer with the local nongovernmental organization Amazon Frontlines.She added that her side would immediately begin demanding that the state comply with the judges’ ruling before any extraction activities in Waorani territory can advance.Apart from the immediate victory for the Waorani community, this ruling effectively stops drilling plans in the territory of the seven other nationalities who were consulted during the 2012 process, before the Amazon was divided into oil blocks, says Espinosa. These communities live in the other 12 oil blocks.This temporarily saves almost 32,300 square kilometers (12,500 square miles) of Amazon rainforest and indigenous land from oil drilling in the southeast of the Ecuador. Experts say drilling in the rainforest could lead to contamination of the rainforest due to oil leaks, spills, and waste dumping. The creation of roads to access the remote area could also pave the way for other industries, such as agriculture, and lead to massive deforestation.Historic opportunityWaorani throw their spears in the air outside the judicial office, celebrating their legal victory against the government. Photo by Mitch Anderson/Amazon Frontlines.One of the more important outcomes was the tribunal’s decision that the 2012 consultation process also violated the community’s right to self-determination. Relating these two issues is “very important,” says Espinosa, as it could override a controversial decree in the Ecuadoran constitution.Under Decree 1247, officials do not have to reach a consensus with communities when they consult with them about extraction projects on their territory. This means the government is allowed to continue with these projects on indigenous land even if those communities say no, thus limiting their territorial autonomy.But April’s ruling reinstates the indigenous right to self-determination. They can now say no to extraction projects, and have stronger legal backing to exercise this autonomy.“Relating consultation with self-determination becomes a powerful lock, because now it has to be understood that the Waorani have a right to governance over their territory. And with that governance, this capacity to own and make decisions on their territory, the state capacity is removed,” says Espinosa.The ruling also presents an opportunity to reshape the free, prior and informed consent process in and of itself, which has long been problematic for communities across Ecuador.A powerful allyWaorani women, waiting for the ruling in their case against the government. Photo by Mitch Anderson/Amazon Frontlines.Last year, Victoria Tauli-Corpuz, the United Nations special rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples, denounced Ecuador’s consultation process after visiting the country and speaking with various indigenous groups there. In her end-of-mission statement, she called for the consultation process to be “reviewed and amended or appealed.”“Communities here are not being consulted in any adequate way,” she told Mongabay in an interview in December. The consultation process often divides these communities, she added, “and in the end the government will do anything they want anyway … that’s one of the weaknesses of the constitution.”The regional court judiciary acknowledged in the ruling for the first time that the consultation process in 2012 was inadequate. By defending its actions, the court said the state had already shown it doesn’t know how that process should be done, says Espinosa.Waorani women pose for photo outside of the judicial office after their legal victory against the government. Photo by Mitch Anderson/Amazon Frontlines.“This is a historic opportunity,” Espinosa said. “Let’s sit down with the state, as well as indigenous peoples and nationalities and finally build that standard of prior, free and informed consultation for Ecuador, which will serve the Waoranis and any other people and nationality.”Espinosa emphasized the importance of taking into account the cultural differences between communities, and says it’s important to avoid creating a homogenous standard to apply to all nationalities.The Ministry of Energy and Non-renewable Natural Resources did not respond to Mongabay’s request for comment by the time of publication, but it announced via social media that it will file for appeal with the Pastaza provincial court.Oil has always been an important part of Ecuador‘s economy. According to the World Bank, it contributed to much of the country’s growth from 2006 to 2014, while the income derived from oil and invested in education, health care and social programs helped lower the poverty rate by 15 percent.But this economy has also come at a cost. Communities across the Amazon have protested against extraction activities in their territories, saying it causes contamination and community displacements.This is the second historic victory for Ecuador’s Amazon rainforest over the past year. Last year, the indigenous Kofan community from the north of Ecuador won a landmark case against the Ecuadoran government for allowing mining operations to continue in their territory that had not undergone a consultation process. Judges in both the regional court and the provincial court of Sucumbíos ruled in favor of the community, and 52 mining concessions along the Aguarico River were canceled.Banner image: Indigenous Waorani march through the streets of Puyo after their legal victory against the government, during a strong downpour. Photo by Mitch Anderson/Amazon Frontlines. About the reporter: Kimberley A. Brown is a Quito, Ecuador-based freelance multimedia journalist who regularly covers the intersection of indigenous land rights and effective conservation. You can find her on Twitter at @KimberleyJBrown. FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this article. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

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first_imgMissile-capable frigate BRP Jose Rizal inches closer to entering PH Navy’s fleet TNT import Donte Greene shoots over Mahindra import Keith Wright. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/ INQUIRER.netTNT will take one last shot in hopes of improving its standing this 2017 PBA Commissioner’s Cup.The KaTropa have parted ways with import Donte Greene, who will be replaced with Joshua Smith  for the team’s final two games in the elimination round.ADVERTISEMENT TNT is already assured of a quarterfinal slot with a 6-3 record, but the KaTropa are still eyeing to snag a seat in the top two.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Racela keeps faith in TNT import Joshua Smith PLAY LIST 00:51Racela keeps faith in TNT import Joshua Smith00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:40Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks01:32Taal Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite Will Voigt to help Mighty, not fill Gilas’ coaching spot Gomez de Liaño bros still undecided on UP return View comments FEU opens Filoil bid with win over CSB School to fine parents for picking up their children latecenter_img World’s shortest man dies in Nepal at 27 MOST READ ‘Maman Dion,’ mother of singer Celine, dies at 92 Duterte’s ‘soft heart’ could save ABS-CBN, says election lawyer Sources close to the situation said the 25-year-old Smith will make his debut on Saturday against Alaska in Legazpi City.The 6-foot-10 Smith spent the last two years with the Rio Grande Valley Vipers in the NBA D-League, where he averaged 8.4 points, 4.8 rebounds, and 1.1 assists this past season.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’Smith will be TNT’s fourth import this conference after Denzel Bowles, Lou Amundson, and Greene.Greene averaged 29.0 points, 14.4 rebounds, 2.4 assists, and 1.4 blocks in seven games for the KaTropa. LATEST STORIES Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. End of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendlast_img read more

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first_imgIT has been a very good season so far for Demish Gaye of the GC Foster College, who has been in great form over the 400m. He was the first Jamaican to go under 45 seconds this season, when he clocked a personal best of 44.85 seconds in early May at a JAAA All Comers Meet inside the National Stadium. Since then, however, he has been bettered by two other Jamaicans in Nathan Allen, with 44.52 seconds, and Akeem Bloomfield, who clocked 44.74. Gaye showed, a few weeks ago, that he is now ready for top competition, as he looked quite relaxed in winning the one lap event at the Jamaica International Invitational Meet in 45.08 seconds where he defeated a decent field. Come this Saturday at the JN Racers Grand Prix, he will face his sternest test when he meets the likes of the Trinidad and Tobago duo of Lalonde Gordon and Machel Cedenio, along with the United States’ Vernon Norwood and Mike Berry and Jamaica’s own Fitzroy Dunkley and national 400m record holder Rusheen McDonald. Based on his progress so far this season, the very talented Gaye looks set to pass this test with flying colours. His coach at the GC Foster College, Maurice Wilson, who is the Technical Director of the country’s Senior Track and field programme, thinks he will do something special on Saturday. “Demish has improved tremendously in relation to his speed. He has so far run 20.48 seconds in 200m, almost 0.4 better than his previous personal best. This season he has run four major 400s and has shown improvement in various different parts of the race. The expectation based on his training is for him to do very well at the Racers Grand Prix Meet, then take that form in to the National Trials where the expectation is that he will take one of the individual spots to the World Championships,” said a very upbeat Wilson. Although he has not yet hit his best form yet this season, Cedenio, who was fourth in Rio last year with a best of 44.01 seconds, could hit top form on Saturday despite a season best of 45,65 seconds. Norwood shows at the Eugene Diamond League that he is getting near to his best after finishing third in 45.05 seconds and with a season best of 44.82 seconds, done in Baton Rouge earlier in the season, he could go all the way. Dunkley, however, showed good form at the Penn Relays when he anchored Jamaica to a rare win over the USA in the mile relay.last_img read more

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first_img GOLD CUP CAMPAIGNERS IN SQUAD Chevone ‘Messi’ Marsh of Cavalier SC is the only newcomer named by the national senior team coach, Theodore Whitmore, for a friendly international against Saudi Arabia, set for October 7 in Riyadh. Marsh is among a 20-man squad that will begin preparation for the upcoming fixture. The 23-year-old midfielder spent loan periods at Ventor County Fusion and Kokkolan Pallovejkor in the Finnish League. He returned home during the summer and represented Cavalier in the opening Red Stripe Premier League game of the new season against Portmore United on Monday. The former Calabar High schoolboy star in April 2016 went on a trial stint in Finland, which sparked controversy with the then Jamaica national team coach Winfried Sch‰fer, who wanted him for a friendly international with Chile. Marsh opted to go to Finland and sign with Kokkolan Palloveikot in the Finnish Ykkonen league, but is now finally set to make his debut. Michael Seaton, who made his debut for the senior team against Trinidad and Tobago as a 17-year-old on November 15, 2013, is back in the senior team squad. He scored his first senior team international goal against St Lucia on March 5, 2014 and represents Maccabi Ahi Nazareth in Israel. The striker also represented Jamaica at the Under-17, Under-20 and Under-23 levels. The Reggae Boyz squad also has members of the squad that lost 2-1 in the CONCACAF Gold Cup final against the United States in the final last July. In a previous friendly inter-national, Jamaica was beaten 2-0 by Canada at the BMO Field in Toronto Full squad: Michael Seaton, Ricardo Morris, Ewan Grandison, Ladel Richie, Alex Marshall, Oniel Fisher, Damion Lowe, Dwayne Miller, Damion Hyatt, Romario Williams, Jermaine Taylor, JeVaughn Watson, Shaun Francis, Kemar Lawrence, Marvin Morgan, Jamiel Hardware, Devon Williams, Fabian Reid, Rosario Harriott, and Chevone Marsh.last_img read more

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first_imgKRASNODAR, Russia (AP)  – With only two days to go before Spain’s opening match at the World Cup, Julen Lopetegui was fired as national team coach after accepting a job to lead Real Madrid next season. Spanish football federation president Luis Rubiales, who made the announcement on Wednesday in Krasnodar, later said Fernando Hierro would replace Lopetegui as coach for Spain’s match against Portugal in Sochi on Friday. The 50-year-old Hierro, a former national team player and Real Madrid captain, will be taking on his first major coaching job. He had been acting as the federation’s sports director and was already in Russia with the national team. Rubiales said firing Lopetegui wasn’t the best solution but it was needed after the federation was caught by surprise by Madrid’s announcement. “The federation cannot be left out of a negotiation by one of its workers and be informed five minutes before the press release,” Rubiales said. “We have been compelled to act.” Rubiales, who took over as president last month, said Lopetegui disrespected the federation’s values and it was the only decision he could make. “It’s a difficult situation, but we are not the ones who determined the action that had to be taken. The federation has its values and it has to maintain them,” Rubiales said. “It may look like a weakness now, but with time this will make us stronger.” Rubiales said he tried to keep the Madrid announcement from being made public but it wasn’t possible. He said he had to make the decision — which was supported by the federation’s board of directors — to “send a clear message” that things have to be done properly. There were reports that players tried to persuade Rubiales to change his mind and keep Lopetegui on the job. “We are the national team. We represent this emblem, these colours, our fans, a country,” Spain captain Sergio Ramos wrote on Twitter. “Our responsibility and commitment is to you. Yesterday, today and tomorrow, together.” Because he was fired, Madrid won’t have to pay the  US$2.3 million of the termination clause on Lopetegui’s contract. Rubiales said that although the federation’s financial situation was not ideal, money was “not the most important thing in a moment like this.” Lopetegui did not attend the news conference but was expected to speak to the media after returning to Spain. Hierro was expected to lead his players for the first time in a practice session later Wednesday. The former defender spent most of his career with Real Madrid but finished his playing days with English club Bolton in 2005. He played in four World Cups with Spain, from 1990 to 2002, and in two European Championships, 1996 and 2000. Hierro was Carlo Ancelotti’s assistant at Real Madrid after Zinedine Zidane left the post in 2014. He coached second-division club Real Oviedo two seasons ago and was Malaga’s general manager after leaving his sports director position with the Spanish federation in 2011. After Madrid’s announcement that it hired Lopetegui, critics immediately began questioning some of the coach’s decisions with the national team, including his choice to leave some Barcelona players such as Sergi Roberto out of the World Cup squad. There were also questions about how Lopetegui would be able to fully focus on the national team while also having to discuss off-season signings for his new club. There are six Madrid players in Spain’s team for the World Cup. Lopetegui’s name had not been mentioned by Spanish media among the probable candidates for the Madrid job, which opened up after Zidane unexpectedly quit. Last month, Lopetegui agreed to extend his contract with the national team through 2020. “I admire and respect Lopetegui a lot. He is a top coach, and that made it harder to make this decision,” Rubiales said. “Winning is important, but above that, we need to know how things have to be handled.” It was a difficult departure for the 51-year-old Lopetegui, who took over from Vicente del Bosque after the 2016 European Championship and had been credited with reviving a team that was on the decline after winning Euro 2008, the 2010 World Cup and Euro 2012. By successfully blending talented youngsters and veterans from its golden generation, Lopetegui kept Spain unbeaten through 20 matches in charge, comfortably leading the team to the World Cup from a qualifying group that included Italy.last_img read more

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