first_img GOLD CUP CAMPAIGNERS IN SQUAD Chevone ‘Messi’ Marsh of Cavalier SC is the only newcomer named by the national senior team coach, Theodore Whitmore, for a friendly international against Saudi Arabia, set for October 7 in Riyadh. Marsh is among a 20-man squad that will begin preparation for the upcoming fixture. The 23-year-old midfielder spent loan periods at Ventor County Fusion and Kokkolan Pallovejkor in the Finnish League. He returned home during the summer and represented Cavalier in the opening Red Stripe Premier League game of the new season against Portmore United on Monday. The former Calabar High schoolboy star in April 2016 went on a trial stint in Finland, which sparked controversy with the then Jamaica national team coach Winfried Sch‰fer, who wanted him for a friendly international with Chile. Marsh opted to go to Finland and sign with Kokkolan Palloveikot in the Finnish Ykkonen league, but is now finally set to make his debut. Michael Seaton, who made his debut for the senior team against Trinidad and Tobago as a 17-year-old on November 15, 2013, is back in the senior team squad. He scored his first senior team international goal against St Lucia on March 5, 2014 and represents Maccabi Ahi Nazareth in Israel. The striker also represented Jamaica at the Under-17, Under-20 and Under-23 levels. The Reggae Boyz squad also has members of the squad that lost 2-1 in the CONCACAF Gold Cup final against the United States in the final last July. In a previous friendly inter-national, Jamaica was beaten 2-0 by Canada at the BMO Field in Toronto Full squad: Michael Seaton, Ricardo Morris, Ewan Grandison, Ladel Richie, Alex Marshall, Oniel Fisher, Damion Lowe, Dwayne Miller, Damion Hyatt, Romario Williams, Jermaine Taylor, JeVaughn Watson, Shaun Francis, Kemar Lawrence, Marvin Morgan, Jamiel Hardware, Devon Williams, Fabian Reid, Rosario Harriott, and Chevone Marsh.last_img read more

read more

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREFrumpy Middle-aged Mom: My realistic 2020 New Year’s resolutions. Some involve doughnuts.Jaregui, 33, is only one of many developmentally disabled people who utilize the wide variety of resources available at the Whittier Area Parents Association for the Developmentally Handicapped. According executive director Steve Boyer, the organization, which was founded in 1969, currently serves as a resource center for about 180 disabled individuals, providing or assisting them with a broad spectrum of education and housing services. To help clients who have disorders that interfere with speech communication, Boyer said WAPADH has adopted a strategy known as faciliated communication. “These are people that have not been invited into the communication world for years,” Boyer said. Now that they are able to express themselves, “it really forces us to re-think how we view their abilities,” he said. WHITTIER – Nathan Jaregui squints with concentration at the keyboard and screen in front of him. Slowly, he hunts out letters and forms them into complete sentences. Brady Miller-Wakeham, a communication facilitator, sits at his elbow, supporting his arm. Occasionally, when Jaregui gets distracted, she reminds him to focus on writing. With Miller-Wakeham at his side and using the keyboard, Jaregui is now able to do something he was never able to do as a child – communicate. Jaregui is autistic. Like others with the disorder, he has difficulty with oral communication and motor skills. “What this allows them to do is really be a greater part of our community and have a unique voice.” Boyer said many people have the misperception that people with physical disabilities are retarded. “It’s a cultural perception, and that’s what we’re constantly fighting,” he said. Patrick Leibert, 49, has autism and has been doing facilitated communication for about 10 years. Both he and Jaregui went through childhood before facilitated communication was common practice in the United States. They had virtually no method of expression. Growing up autistic was “very frustrating, because people though I couldn’t understand anything,” Jaregui typed out. “But really I couldn’t get my body to do what I want it to. It’s very hard to have my thoughts stuck inside.” Jaregui added that people often considered him nice, but also assumed that he was “unable to be intelligent.” Leibert agreed. “I think the most common misperception is that people think we have a disability that keeps us from having a normal life like anyone else,” he typed with the help of facilitator Daniel Gomez. “It was very frustrating because I wouldn’t have anybody to listen to what I had to say for many years, and I have things to say. Nobody could hear me.” Boyer said that Leibert has spent a lot of time explaining what he went through as a child to his family. Leibert’s mother, Virgia, is a volunteer board member at WAPADH. She said Patrick has been at the center for about 26 years. Since he has been able to communicate, other aspects of his behavior have improved. “He used to get frustrated, and you don’t see that very often now,” she said. “He can get out what he wants to say.” The facility also has a volunteer board and a crew of paid staff members who work with the clients directly, running the center’s programs. “The programs are to help them move along and learn. They express what they want to do, and WAPADH helps them,” she said. The center has always been enormously helpful to the family, she added. “Whenever he needs something, he can always get it there.” Lately, Patrick and many others have had a need that has been long neglected. “We have a greater demand for academic kinds of activities,” Boyer said. Facilitated communication “has opened up a whole new world for people. These guys have these labels, and because of that their intellectual needs were not addressed.” Patrick and Sue Rubin, who is a student at Whittier college, are both history buffs. “My favorite subject is history, and I’m interested in learning more of it,” Leibert said. Rubin majors in ancient history at Whittier. Her passion is advocating for people with autism and facilitated communication. She and Stewart Se, who has Down’s syndrome, were lucky enough to have benefited from the method at young ages. “I was able to take regular classes and graduate with a regular diploma,” Se typed out with Miller-Wakeham’s support. “I had a happy experience once I began typing because I was able to show how smart I was.” Aaron Aguilar expressed another need that often isn’t met. A diehard Angel’s fan who loves to cook, he left the room with a smile and a message: “Thanks for getting to know me.” Bethania Palma (562) 698-0955, Ext. 3051160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

read more