Fantastic Furlongs pass the test on Ireland’s Fittest Family

first_imgA Donegal family have entered the battle for the title of Ireland’s Fittest Family in the action-packed RTE reality series.The Furlongs from Greencastle Inishowen had great success in the first episode of the new series which aired on Sunday. The fun-loving family are well-used to racing together and they made it over the line to join coach Donncha O’Callaghan’s team.Mum Kate, dad Alan and daughters Leonie and Orlaith impressed in the nail-biting Vertigo test, with Kate overcoming her fear of heights to scale a plank 33ft over Dublin. The four Team Furlong members are: Dad Alan (56) who enjoys running and is a retired hurling player; mum Kate, (56) who runs and practices Reiki; daughter Leonie (26) works as a Chartered Accountant in Galway and is a keen runner and footballer; Orlaith (25) is in her final year of her PhD studying to be a nutritionist. She’s a gym junkie and loves water sports.The new series of Ireland’s Fittest Family became even more ambitious this year as 20 families from across Ireland took on the first set of challenges.Team RooneyThe Rooneys from Ballyshannon also battled it out in the opening episode.Their all-rounder team was made up of ultra-cyclist mum Eleanor (53), county footballer and hurler Oisin (20), lifeguard, triathlete and Gaelic footballer Maebh (19) and county Minor Footballer and Hurler Senan (16). However, despite their mighty effort, the Rooney family didn’t make it to the coaches’ selection. Fans of the qualifying Furlongs will have to wait two weeks to catch the clan on their screens in episode three on Sunday 11th November.The team will be battling under Coach Donncha’s mentorship for a place in the quarterfinals.Back in 2016, the Ryan Family from Kilmacrennan enjoyed notable success in Ireland’s Fittest Family, coming third in the final.Fantastic Furlongs pass the test on Ireland’s Fittest Family was last modified: October 31st, 2018 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:furlongsIreland’s Fittest FamilyrooneysRTEteam furlonglast_img read more

As a nation we can achieve our goals – Miller Matola

first_imgThis week South Africa returns to the global stage when we host the annual Investing in African Mining Indaba at the Cape Town International Convention Centre, writes Brand South Africa CEO Miller Matola. This follows our success at the World Economic Forum annual meeting Davos, Switzerland, a few weeks ago. Delegates at the 2014 Investing in African Mining Indaba. (Image: Mining Indaba) Brand South Africa CEO Miller MatolaI am confident the message we conveyed to the world in Davos – that South Africa is open for business and remains a reliable and attractive investment destination – will be reinforced at the gathering of the captains of the mining industry.Mining Indaba will be followed by the annual State of the Nation address in the National Assembly in Cape Town on 12 February. This is one of the most important addresses of the year, as it accounts for the past 12 months and the guides us on priorities for the year ahead. It is an opportunity for President Jacob Zuma to take South Africans into his confidence about the state of the country.We can achieve our priorities and goals once we have the necessary economic growth and development. As a nation we need to achieve a set of goals: necessary and enabling legislation and policy, and the will and ability to implement these policies to ensure we achieve the desired outcomes. As a nation we must foster the desire to work together across all sectors because, at the end of the day, we all have a role to play in growing and building our country.Yes, we have challenges. But I remain unwavering in my belief that we– as a nation – have all the qualities necessary to drive our country’s growth and development. We were strangers to each other once, but we have given life to a resilient and agile homeland. We have the perseverance borne of a confidence and pride in our new democracy. I am confident that we will rise to the challenge to play our part and be the active citizens who will take our country to new heights.Join the conversation and follow Team South Africa at Mining Indaba on @Brand_SA via the hashtag #MiningIndaba. Follow the State of the Nation Address on #SONA2015Miller Matola is the CEO of Brand South Africa. Follow him on @MillerMatolaThis article was originally published in the 8 February edition of Sunday Independent.last_img read more

How the smart stadium will transform the smart city

first_imgFor Self-Driving Systems, Infrastructure and In… How Connected Communities Can Bolster Your Busi… Martin Otterson Related Posts Tags:#Internet of Things#IoT#OSISoft#Qualcomm#San Diego Padres#Smart Cities#Taylor Swift center_img How IoT Will Play an Important Role in Traffic … What’s the difference between a monster truck rally and a Taylor Swift concert?Water. You can’t hold a monster truck rally without thousands of cubic meters of mud, which in turn can mean tens of thousands if not hundreds of thousands of gallons of water. By the same token, Taylor Swift’s ornate lighting and staging could can cause power consumption to zoom up the charts and unnaturally force a venue into the red zone for peak power charges. (The prevalence of tattoos, however, at both events is probably about even.)The ability to charge accurate “bill backs” to promoters rather than just somewhat arbitrary flat fee are one of the many drivers of the smart stadium, i.e. venues wired with predictive analytics and sensors to fine-tune costs, consumption and even the fan experience. See also: 5 key technologies of a smart cityStadiums can be extremely difficult facilities to manage. Occupancy can zoom from a handful of people to more than 100,000 and back to empty in a few hours. They can snarl traffic, create havoc between regular residents and visitors and consume more power and/or natural gas than any building in the region. No one wants a repeat of the Super Bowl blackout. At the same time they are also monuments to civic pride. IoT can help smooth out those differences and make everyone good neighbors.The Seattle Mariners, for instance, managed to cut water consumption by 10%, or 2 million gallons, over a three year period in part through IoT technology. IoT help the team pinpoint leaks in pipes. (The team also discovered it only costs around $5 in power to open and close its retractable roof.)The San Diego Padres, meanwhile, have installed LED lights, smart sensors and data management systems to better control water and power. A typical game can require 70 megawatt hours of power, 740 therms of natural gas and over 72,000 gallons of water, or about 48 hot tubs. Through IoT, the team expects to cut resources by more than 25% over the next five years. The stadium is a key “citizen” of tomorrow’s citiesBut the benefits go far beyond power. Sound abatement is increasingly one of the biggest problems for venues as stadiums and urbanites continue to flock to the heart of town. IoT gives people an objective way to monitor and better control sound. Better security and safety? IoT in one venue alerted the staff to a small fire caused by a hot dog roller that was accidentally left on after a game. Smart cameras for parking lots and surrounding streets will likely become standard to reduce the crime and vandalism that can sometimes mar public events.Want to find shorter beer lines? Avoid the bathroom with a major flood? Or figure out the best way to get home or to the airport based on anticipated traffic and public transportation options? There will be an app for that. And this is just the beginning. There are an estimated 12,216 stadiums worldwide, according to World Stadiums, and a growing number are located in megacities and emerging markets where water is scarce, power is fragile, and traffic is horrendous. Some stadiums are sparkling new, while others, date back to the 1920s. These venues can become open showcases for what’s possible. Let the games begin. The author is Senior Vice President of Sales, Marketing and Partners at OSIsoft. Surveillance at the Heart of Smart Citieslast_img read more

Could this new compound give you a suntan—without the sun?

first_img By Ryan CrossJun. 13, 2017 , 12:15 PM Could this new compound give you a suntan—without the sun? A newly discovered compound may one day allow beachgoers to get a natural tan without exposure to ultraviolet rays. kaliostro/iStockphoto A new compound promises to give human skin a suntan without the sun. The compound hasn’t yet been tested in clinical trials—just in mice and on patches of human skin leftover from surgeries. But doctors are hopeful it could one day combat skin cancer by keeping people away from harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays.“Assuming there are no safety concerns, it is clearly a better option than UV exposure,” says Jerod Stapleton, a behavioral scientist at the Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey in New Brunswick who studies indoor tanning and was not involved in the work. “We are talking about millions of young people potentially not using tanning beds each year. … It could be a game-changer for skin cancer prevention.”The advance has its origins in a strain of “redhead” mice with rust-colored fur. The rodents harbor a variant of a gene called MC1R that gives rise to red hair and fair skin in humans. A properly functioning MC1R gene encodes a receptor that sits on the surface of skin cells called melanocytes, which transmit a signal to crank out dark melanin pigments; these pigments help protect skin cells from UV radiation. The redhead version of the receptor doesn’t respond to the make-more-melanin signal, which explains why redheaded humans tend to burn, not tan.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)David Fisher, a dermatologist at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, reasoned that he could help people tan by finding a way to stimulate this melaninmaking pathway. He and chemist Nathanael Gray of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston targeted a protein called salt-inducible kinase (SIK), which works like a master off switch in the melanin factory. They bought a molecule known to inhibit SIK from a chemical supplier, and applied the compound as a liquid to the shaven backs of the redhead mice. After 7 days of daily treatment, the mouse skin turned “almost jet black,” Fishers says. The tan was reversible though, and the rodents’ skin tone returned mostly back to normal in about 2 weeks. Fisher notes that were no apparent safety concerns, but this would need to be tested more rigorously before human application.Next, Fisher and Gray made several new versions of the compound with different chemical modifications to help it penetrate human skin, and tested it on patches of skin discarded from surgical procedures. One of their compounds made a brown splotch, indicating that it was able to reach the melanocytes in the skin and spur melanin production, the team reports today in Cell Reports.Under the microscope, the tan produced by the compound looks just like a natural tan, Fisher says, unlike spray tans and other sunless tanning products, which rely on dyes to stain dead skin cells and provide no UV protection. Melanin is known to provide some UV protection, although the team didn’t test this on the redhead mice in this study. If the compound proves safe for human use, it would provide tanners an alternative to the illicitly used synthetic hormone called melanotan, which has been associated with skin cancer.Fisher emphasizes that the new compound would not replace sunscreen, but instead be used alongside it. Because the compound simply ramps up melanin production, it should work on all skin types, but could prove most helpful for fair-skinned people at greatest risk for developing skin cancer, he says. Fisher is now looking for collaborators to test the compound in a clinical setting.Still, even if the new compound hits store shelves, experts urge caution. “I worry these molecules could give people a false sense of security,” says Jennifer Herrmann, a dermatologic surgeon at Moy-Fincher-Chipps Facial Plastics & Dermatology in Beverly Hills, California, who has studied the use of tanning accelerator products. “If you are just slightly darker, you may not give yourself a huge amount of protection,” she says, noting that a tan provides less shielding from the sun’s UV rays than a low-SPF sunscreen.last_img read more

Tabloid offered me money and British Passport: Yasir Hameed

first_imgCategorically denying that he gave an interview to News of the World, Pakistan Test opener Yasir Hameed on Sunday claimed that the tabloid has offered him money and British passport for not denying the story.The tabloid quoted Yasir Hameed as saying that almost all Pakistan matches were fixed and he himself denied a mouth- watering offer from a bookie.The new revelations further deepened the crisis which has engulfed Pakistan cricket as three of their players were suspended by the ICC and are being questioned by Scotland Yard in London for their alleged role in spot-fixing.However, Hameed denied giving an interview to the News of the World.”I never knew they were recording anything. This guy came to me to talk about a bat sticker sponsorship deal. He started talking about the News of the World stories and I just repeated them. I had general discussion with him.”The News of the World called up my brother and offered him money and British passport to not deny this story,” Hameed claimed.Hameed, who played in the last two Tests against England, also claimed that the video had also been doctored.”I have told the team management that the newspaper is claiming that I have given them an interview. This is not correct. I deny it,” he said.Spot-Fixing Scandal: ICC writes to AkmalScotland Yard might not have called him for questioning but Pakistani wicket-keeper Kamran Akmal remains under the ICC’s scanner with cricket’s world governing body reportedly writing to him in the wake of the ‘spot-fixing’ scandal.advertisementAccording to the BBC, “Akmal has been contacted in writing by the ICC, though there is no suggestion that he is the fourth player (under investigation) and it is not in relation to incidents in the recent fourth Test at Lord’s.”Akmal was suspected of match-fixing earlier this year as well when he dropped as many as four catches during the Sydney Test against Australia, which Ricky Ponting’s men miraculously won by 36 runs.The latest corruption scandal, which has left Pakistan embarrassed and angry in equal measure, has so far led to the suspension of Salman Butt, Mohammad Asif and Mohammad Aamir.Pakistan High Commissioner Wajid Shamsul Hasan, who has been lambasting the ICC for suspending the players and calling the entire episode a conspiracy against Pakistan, climbed down slightly.After vouching for the players’ innocence for days, he said, “If the News of the World evidence is correct, then I would banish them from cricket.last_img read more