first_imgEcology, Environment, Environmental Policy, Fish, Marine, Marine Animals, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Conservation, Marine Crisis, Marine Ecosystems, Microplastics, Oceans, Plastic, Pollution, Recycling, Sea Turtles, Sustainability, Waste, Water Pollution, Wildlife Conservation Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored In January, the Flipflopi, a boat built of recycled plastic, set sail on a 500-kilometer (310-mile) voyage along the East African coast.The purpose? To raise awareness about ocean pollution and call for the repurposing of, and a possible ban on, single-use plastics.Globally, research on and attention to marine plastic pollution is mounting, showing that microplastics travel up the food chain, and that marine life and people alike are being exposed to microplastics through their food. WATAMU, Kenya — One Saturday mid-morning in late January, close to 100 people descended on the narrow streets of Watamu village along Kenya’s north coast to clean up the streets.Local beach cleaners in their white and blue T-shirts, children in school uniforms and ordinary villagers defied the sweltering heat. They picked up plastic bottles, bags and wrappers; glass bottles; old clothes and other litter from doorsteps, alleys, hedges, tree branches, gaping manholes and abandoned houses. By the time they approached the Watamu beach more than three hours later, they had collected tons of plastics.Despite being sweaty and tired, the children still had energy to play. They sorted the different types of plastics and used them to create images of marine life on the sandy beach. The plastics were later taken away to a local organization for recycling into construction bricks and works of art.Watamu school children help clean their village. Image by Anthony Langat for Mongabay.Just off the beach bobbed the Flipflopi, a colorful 10-meter-long (33-foot-long) boat built exclusively out of recycled plastics. Its multicolored hull, clad in patches made from discarded flip-flops, set it apart from the other boats nearby. Its builders cum crew sat aboard offering short rides and explaining its materials, building process, strength and stability at sea to groups of curious visitors, who were ferried from shore by a smaller boat.The Flipflopi had set sail from the town of Lamu a day before, embarking on a 14-day, 500-kilometer (310-mile) expedition along the East African coast to Stone Town in Zanzibar, Tanzania. The purpose of the voyage was to show the possibilities of recycling single-use plastics and to educate people on the effects of marine plastic pollution.The plastic problem in Watamu, a popular tourist destination, reflects the situation not only in Africa but also globally. In a 2017 paper in Science Advances researchers estimate that as of 2015 the world was producing 400 million metric tons of plastics annually and discarding 300 million metric tons. A 2017 study in Environmental Science & Technology estimated that 88 to 95 percent of plastic pollution in the oceans comes from just 10 rivers, eight in Asia and two in Africa.Garbage, mainly plastics, collected during the Watamu village cleanup. Image by Anthony Langat for Mongabay.Plastics choke Kenyan marine lifeThe Tana is Kenya’s longest river, flowing about 1,000 kilometers (620 miles) from the central part of the country to the Indian Ocean, enough distance to collect tons of plastics. It empties into the sea about 45 kilometers (28 miles) northeast of Watamu.In a study published last year, Charles Kosore, a researcher at the Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute in Mombasa, documented the presence of microplastics in Kenyan waters and their ingestion by zooplankton, tiny microscopic animals. It found that “microplastics have the potential to enter pelagic food webs and cause pollution in the study area.”Globally, research on and attention to marine plastic pollution is mounting, showing that microplastics travel up the food chain, and that marine life and people alike are being exposed to microplastics through their food. A doctoral student at the University of Bern in Switzerland calculated that plastic pollution causes $13 billion in financial damages to marine ecosystems per year, according to World Finance magazine.Hassan Shaffir, a fisherman and boat builder from Lamu, aboard the FlipFlopi in Watamu, Kenya. Image by Anthony Langat for Mongabay.Kenyan fishers are certainly aware of the cost. Hassan Shaffir, a fisherman from Lamu, said plastics in the ocean have made him poorer in recent years. While fishing at sea, Shaffir said, he and his colleagues regularly encounter long rows of plastics dumped in by the rivers. These break their fishing nets, requiring repairs that cost money and take valuable time away from fishing.“There are a lot of plastics in the sea and for those of us who fish using nets, we find it harder to catch fish,” he said. “If the plastic bottle attaches to the net it makes a sound, frightening the fish and instead of catching fish we catch plastic.”Shaffir added that the fish eat plastic, mistaking it for food. Mohamed Ali, a Watamu fisherman, observed the same. “The most affected are the sea turtles,” he said. “We find that they are mostly choked by the plastics, which they find at sea.”Jane Gitau, a senior warden with Kenya Wildlife Service in charge of Watamu Marine National Park and Reserve, acknowledged the problem. “We have seen deaths of endangered species, particularly the sea turtle,” which sometimes mistakes plastics for jellyfish, its main food, she said. “We have collected many carcasses of sea turtles due to this problem.”A Watamu resident during the village cleanup. Image by Anthony Langat for Mongabay.A boat made of flip-flopsThe Flipflopi’s builders aim to show that recycling can help clean the seas. But, they say, a ban on single-use plastics is what’s needed to put an end to ocean plastic pollution.“We all know that we have reached a tipping point,” Dipesh Pabari, one of the project’s initiators, told Mongabay. “There has to be change. You’ve got the waste that exists and there is too much of it. And we can put it to a second life but ultimately we have to find a way to end it.”The Flipflopi is the brainchild of Ben Morison, an Anglo-Ethiopian who spent his early years in Kenya. Seeing a small dhow made of flip-flops in Zanzibar inspired him to build his own boat out of plastics. Together with Pabari, his Kenyan childhood friend, he set out to achieve the dream in 2015.It wasn’t easy building the boat. “A lot of research and development went into the design of the materials, some of which were made in Malindi [a town near Watamu] and others in Nairobi,” said Pabari.The Flipflopi under sail from Watamu to Kilifi, Kenya. Image by Anthony Langat for Mongabay.They sent samples of the materials, molded bricks or planks made from compressed bottles and other plastics, to Northumbria University in England for tests several times until they arrived at a desired combination of strength and weight. It took three years to complete the boat because they were doing everything for the first time.Ali Skanda, Flipflopi’s chief boat builder and captain, was ecstatic about having completed the boat and being able to sail it. “It is my hope that with this boat we are going to inspire more people to stop littering and start recycling plastics so that we can have a cleaner ocean for everyone,” he said.The United Nations Environment Programme sponsored the Flipflopi’s Lamu-to-Zanzibar expedition through its Clean Seas Campaign. Between stops on the voyage, passengers collected samples of sea water to be analyzed later for microplastics, macrofibers and microfibers.“We have got various kinds of scientific equipment and a lot of it is for citizen science, the results of which we will make available to the world,” said Simon Scott-Harden, a lecturer in product design at Northumbria University who oversaw the sampling. “We are very interested to find out about the microfibers that we find in the ocean … This comes from clothing and it is a big problem that we need to address,” he said.Art works made of flipflops at the Watamu Marine Association office. In the background, recycled bottles are visible as a component of the office walls. Image by Anthony Langat for Mongabay.While most African countries recycle plastics, they don’t do it on a scale big enough to curb pollution. In 2015, South Africa, one of the biggest economies in Africa, recycled approximately 293,000 metric tons through more than 200 recycling companies.Kenya has far fewer companies recycling plastics. There are organizations like EcoPost, which makes recycled-plastic lumber; Ocean Sole, which turns old flip-flops into art and functional products; and Alternative Energy Systems, which converts waste plastic into fuels like synthetic oil. In 2018, a non-profit called PETCO Kenya launched to promote recycling of plastic bottles; it has the modest goal of recycling 14,000 tons by 2025.Steve Trott, director of Ecoworld, the Watamu Marine Association’s plastic recycling project, holds a discarded bottle at the organization’s collection yard. Image by Anthony Langat for Mongabay.EcoWorld, a Watamu-based project whose members and employees helped out with the cleanup, collects plastics from the beach and major tourist hotels and recycles them into construction bricks and art materials. The project is planning to expand its operations to more towns along the Kenyan coast. “We would like to collect more plastics because the companies that we sell to for further recycling have the capacity to recycle as much as we can offer,” said Steve Trott, EcoWorld’s director.For her part, park warden Gitau called for an increase in the recycling of plastics in the region. “The more we recycle means less plastics getting into the ocean and we will have a clean sea and healthy fish,” she said.Trash clutters the shore of Mombasa, Kenya. The Flipflopi made a stopover in Mombasa and other coastal towns on its voyage from Lamu, Kenya, to Zanzibar, Tanzania. Image by Anthony Langat for Mongabay.Anthony Langat is a Kenyan freelance journalist who writes about climate change, the environment, development and human rights. He contributes to Mongabay, Al Jazeera, Devex, Thomson Reuters Foundation, and Equal Times among other publications. CitationsGeyner, R., Jambeck, J.R., Lavender Law, K. (2017). Production, use, and fate of all plastics ever made Science Advances Vol. 3, no. 7, e1700782.Schmidt, C., Krauth, T., Wagner, S. (2017). Export of Plastic Debris by Rivers into the Sea. Environmental Science & Technology 51(21), 12246-12253.Kosore, C., Ojwang, L., Maghanga, J., Kamau, J., Kimeli, A., Omukoto, J., Ngisiag’e, N., Mwaluma, J., Ong’ada, H., Magori, C., Ndirui, E. (2018). Occurrence and ingestion of microplastics by zooplankton in Kenya’s marine environment: first documented evidence. African Journal of Marine Science 40:3, 225-234, DOI: 10.2989/1814232X.2018.1492969FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Article published by Rebecca Kesslerlast_img read more

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first_img…on NGSAIt’s said “Those whom the Gods wish to destroy, they first make mad.” This Eyewitness really believes some folks making policy at the Education Ministry may be “mad” – in the sense of how the ancients used it. Doing things that just doesn’t stand to reason. Take this latest decision on the NGSA – to now have the kids write their names on the exam papers.Why in the world would they want to do this? Well let’s look at the reasons they provided. For Paper I – which is all multiple choice – they claim the students writing their names will guarantee they were the ones who actually answered the questions!! Well they should tell the long suffering students and their parents, what will be different if stand-ins write those same names.Is the Ministry going to have a data bank of signatures of these 11-year-olds to compare the written signatures against? But really!! The NGSA’s written in the same schools the kids attend. Can anyone really think an “imposter kid” can show up among kids who spent six years together and not be outed? What a crock!!And even if some precociously cunning kids are gaming the system by having “imposters” take their place – wouldn’t it be better to install the system in place for CSEC. Have the cherubs submit their pics which can be presented with their Candidate Numbers on the Exam Day?For Paper II, the students will now have to not only write their names – but also their addresses, date of birth and gender on a page that’s kept by the administrators – but doesn’t go up to the markers! We’re not told why the administrators need that data – which should be already in the system. Or what they’ll do with it. But with Paper II going up to the markers without the names on the kids’ submissions, couldn’t the aforesaid precociously cunning kids substitute their “stand-ins” for them?But we all know this is all BS…isn’t it? So will the powers-that-be who will determine the life chances of the next 14,500 kids writing the NGSA (specific high school attended and income are highly correlated) give us the real scoop? As it is, folks out there think the present Administration wants to fiddle with the present randomised distribution of the top 10 per cent. In a country so divided that people look at the origin of people who’re selected as dog catchers. Can you imagine the rap the Government will take if they allow this hare-brained scheme to go through?Hope they’re learnt from the present imbroglio that silence may be golden, but not in politics.…on Holder in Costa RicaWe know Agriculture Minister Noel Holder’s out in Costa Rica…no one is sure why…but he’s there all right. Our media says he’s there for development of our livestock sector. But this Eyewitness thinks that’s only because the fella in charge of our livestock programme accompanied him. However, the Costa Rican media says:“Among the areas for discussion are the systematic, participatory, and organised approaches to dealing with agriculture in the region; support for the construction of medium and long-term visions, enabling each country to achieve its development goals and to look at the international vision for dealing with global phenomena related to agriculture and rural life.“The objective of the visit is to improve the productivity and competitiveness of the agricultural sector, strengthen agriculture’s contribution to the development of territories and well-being of the rural population and improve agricultural capacity to mitigate and adapt to climate change.”In other words – more bloviating BS.…in closing LBIMinister Holder was heavily criticised for not visiting Wales Estate when he closed it down and threw 1700 sugar workers into the streets.They can’t do that with the closure of LBI throwing another 700 out on their ears.The man’s not in the country!!last_img read more

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first_imgRangers midfielder Eros Grezda insists the team showed character during their 2-1 win over Hearts despite being one man down for more than 20 minutes.Rangers fell behind to an early own goal from defender Gareth McAuley but scored twice before half-time through Connor Goldson and Alfredo Morelos.Steven Gerrard’s men had to play the last 20 minutes of the game with ten men after Scott Arfield saw red for a late challenge on keeper Zdenek Zlamal.But Grezda reckons the team’s determination showed through as they battled to earn an important victory.He said, according to Evening Times: “It was a really hard game. The guys never lost belief after going 1-0 down and we came back fast. We are very happy.”Rangers is still behind Celtic: John Hartson Manuel R. Medina – September 3, 2019 According to the former Celtic player, there’s still a massive gap between his ex-club and Rangers in the Scottish Premier League.“It’s a long way to the end [of the season] but for the moment we have a lot of games and we just have to go one by one.”“We have to give maximum effort in every game and go for the win. But the end is so far.”“As I said we go for every win so we will see what will happen.”“That’s football. We lacked a bit in the first 20 minutes but after they scored we showed our best face and scored two goals and that decided it.”“We played with less players in the second half but I’m really proud of the guys that they made it.”last_img read more

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first_imgHe is an artist by soul, having more than 40 years of experience in the field using different mediums, he has also designed several Festivals in India and abroad.The Capital will soon witness his next exhibition titled, The Mask journey continues… The mask is a projection of our serene outer self as it disguises the suffering of the inner soul. At one end masks symbolises the face of falsehood, at another they give us an all new identity – a new face. The artiste believes we often wish to have a power that not just allows us to read someone’s mind but also our own at times, to see who lives behind that face. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Elaborating  the theme he says, ‘Masks can project our tumultuous state of mind and hide those inner feelings. Mask can shield us from danger or can suggest danger to others. They can be part of our assumption of what we would like to be, or of what we fear we may become.’ In his works every individual mask is reflective of how we perceive ourselves, how we want others to perceive us, and how we perceive those around us. Basically, leading a simple life, devoid of any dual-faced identity is not so tough but then how to convince the mind, which keeps throwing up wild thoughts and worries to complicate things or rather life further.When: 18 January, 11 amWhere: M.F Hussain Art Gallerylast_img read more

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first_img Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Register Now » 5 min read Two years ago, serial entrepreneur Kris Duggan was itching to start another company, following his success in founding Medsphere, a government open-source medical platform, and OzNetwork, an Internet media company.Inspired by the popularity of social games like FarmVille and the Internet gamification trend, he left his position as vice president of sales for Socialtext, a developer of collaboration software for businesses, and began searching for a partner with web development skills. He soon met Wedge Martin, and less than two years later, they have a hit technology startup on their hands: Badgeville, which helps companies boost user engagement by gamifying their websites.Menlo Park, Calif.-based Badgeville applies various elements of social games, such as challenges, points, badges and levels, to non-game business websites. Given the success of FarmVille and other social games, it’s no wonder that companies want to make their brands’ websites and mobile apps more engaging. Because the user’s experience becomes fun and sometimes even addictive, companies often see an increase in Facebook “likes,” customer product reviews and, most important of all, purchases.Growth Spurt: Started in September 2010, Badgeville was initially funded with $300,000 from the founders’ families. While testing the concept, Duggan and Martin got a lucky break. They were invited to participate in the startup launch competition TechCrunch Disrupt Startup Battlefield. Badgeville made it to the final round and won the Audience Choice Award.The Badgeville website was launched during Disrupt, and in the first 30 days after the event, it attracted 20,000 visitors, overwhelming Duggan and Martin with hundreds of qualified business leads–more than they could handle. Martin was still working at IBM, but left the day of Badgeville’s successful launch, realizing that he and Duggan really were on to something.The company now has 50 employees and boasts more than 100 customers. It says revenue last year totaled between $5 million and $10 million and that it has raised $15 million in venture capital. Duggan declines to be more specific about revenue but notes that it grew 400 percent. “With our fast growth and customer traction, we are now on a clear path to profitability,” he says.Working with customers like Dell, Samsung and eBay, Badgeville says that on average, it helped increase social sharing by 200 percent, user-generated content by 50 percent, and conversion of users from nonpaid to paid status by 10 percent in 2011.Samsung, for example, came to Badgeville hoping to increase the number of product reviews users post on its website. The companies combined forces to launch Samsung Nation, a social loyalty program that lets users earn badges for such activities as writing reviews and watching videos and compete for rewards. By using Badgeville’s platform along with its own technologies, Samsung saw a 500% increase in customers’ product reviews.Why It’s Worth Watching: Badgeville’s platform sets it apart from other companies because it can be embedded into any company’s website or app. That means Badgeville can typically promise lower costs because customers don’t have to pay developers to create a customized solution.While gamification is a hot trend, Badgeville doesn’t face a lot of competition in the category–at least not yet. Copycats could start popping up, as more companies try to jump on the gamification bandwagon.Why It Matters: As Badgeville grows, Duggan doesn’t intend to stray from its strong customer focus. “We’ve been very focused on customer acquisition and delivering a product that customers want to buy,” he says.The company has based its decisions on market research. “We did it the old-fashioned way,” Duggan says. “We picked up the phone, and we called [potential customers]. We asked them, ‘If you had this product, would you buy it?'” The research helped Badgeville identify exactly what potential customers wanted and how much they were willing to pay.Looking Ahead: Badgeville is investing in its customer support and marketing teams, as it continues to add clients. Duggan expects revenue to more than double this year and his staff to grow to 100 people in 2012, with most of the expansion in New York and Europe.From a product standpoint, Badgeville’s platform “is about 10% done,” Duggan says. “If you think about all of the different levers you can pull to influence user behavior, we feel like we’ve started off with some really strong ones, but there are so many more… That’s probably going to keep us busy for the next several years.”Tip to Stay Ahead of the Curve: Duggan recommends that business owners “consider how they can leverage gamification inside their businesses and how they can make their experiences with their audiences more social.” That doesn’t just mean using Facebook, he says. Companies “should think about how they can create communities, experiences and engagement that are going to drive results.” He also encourages businesses to thoroughly understand gamification before trying it. “Gamification is not about adding games to your website,” he says. “It’s about identifying ways to drive behavior using techniques from games.”  Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global January 20, 2012 Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.last_img read more

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