Major winter storm bringing dangerous snow, ice, rain to rush hour commutes

first_imgABC News(NEW YORK) — A major winter storm is barreling through the Northeast Tuesday, bringing dangerous snow, ice and rain during the morning and evening commutes. Over 1,500 Tuesday flights had been canceled as of the morning. The hardest hit airport was LaGuardia in New York City with over 400 flights canceled. The Tuesday morning commute “will be nasty in New York City,” Mayor Bill de Blasio warned Monday. The forecast calls for “two to four inches potentially of snow right during the rush hour and we’re very, very concerned,” the mayor said. “That’s a really bad time of day for that all to be hitting.” He urged residents to avoid driving Tuesday if possible. But classes are in session in New York City public schools. New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy has declared a state of emergency. The snow falling in New York City Tuesday morning is forecast to continue through the early afternoon before changing to sleet and rain. In Boston, the snow begins in the afternoon and will be heavy at times — the worst timing for the evening commute. Public schools in Worcester, Massachusetts, are among those closed. The snow will eventually change to rain for all the Northeast coastal cities, but inland, it’s a different story. In Pennsylvania, New York state and New England, some areas may see up to 1 foot of snow. Washington, D.C., should see rain exclusively from the big storm. Philadelphia is forecast to get 1 to 2 inches of snow and sleet New York City is expected to get 2 to 3 inches of snow before getting sleet and freezing rain Boston is forecast for 4 to 5 inches of snow as well as sleet and freezing rain. The storm moves out on Wednesday. Meanwhile, in the Midwest, a major ice storm struck overnight in Chicago, coating power lines and the city’s airports. Wisconsin and Michigan may be in for 1 foot of snow with ice expected from Chicago to Detroit. And on the West Coast, Seattle is buried under record-breaking snow. Seattle was hit on Monday with its fourth snowstorm in one week. With more than 20 inches from the storms, the city is experiencing its snowiest February on record and snowiest overall month in 50 years. That storm is now headed for California, which should see significant rainfall in San Francisco and then Los Angeles. The heaviest rainfall will be in Northern California, where residents could see more than 4 inches of rain.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Vermont Medical Society announces 2020 Leadership Awards

first_imgVMS Honors those who have demonstrated Outstanding Service to Health Care and Community Vermont Business Magazine The Vermont Medical Society (VMS) is pleased to announce this year’s recipients of its prestigious Leadership Awards. The VMS invites you to join us in honoring five individuals who have made outstanding contributions to the health and well-being of Vermonters and the nation during the COVID-19 pandemic.Mark Levine, M.D., of Essex Jct.,VT and Commissioner of the Vermont Department of Health, has been selected as the Vermont Medical Society’s Distinguished Service Award winner for 2020. The Distinguished Service Award is the highest award VMS can bestow upon one of its members and is given on the basis of meritorious service in the science and art of medicine and for outstanding contributions to the medical profession, its organizations, and the welfare of the publicVMS Council-member, Dick Butsch, M.D., said about Dr. Levine, “In a few short months he has undoubtedly saved so many lives and preserved the health of so many people…Most importantly he has established Vermont as the single healthiest State in our country in terms of the SARS-CoV2 Pandemic.”Dr. Levine was nominated for his tireless work mitigating the impact of the COVID pandemic on all Vermonters and his effectiveness at keeping the number of coronavirus cases and deaths in Vermont at some of the lowest in the country. During the pandemic, he has not only spent countless hours obtaining the latest, evidence-based information regarding COVID, but has also consistently and calmly communicated this information and sound public health guidance, to clinicians and all Vermonters. His cogent presentations to both the leaders and the citizens of the state has seen to it that Vermont has been guided through this unprecedented medical event by adhering to the best guidelines that science and clinical expertise can provide. Dr. Levine’s nominators state that he is a thoughtful and calm leader with the highest level of professionalism and evidence-based practice.VMS President Catherine Schneider, M.D., says, “Dr. Levine, you have presented yourself, and hence our profession, to the citizens of Vermont as knowledgeable, competent and compassionate. By exercising the best tenets of our profession in this time of crisis, you have elevated us all. For these reasons you have been chosen to receive this award.”Dr. Levine was named the Commissioner of the Vermont Department of Health in March of 2017. Prior to his appointment, Dr. Levine was a professor of medicine at the University of Vermont, associate dean for graduate medical education, and designated institutional official at the College of Medicine and UVM Medical Center. He received his B.A. in biology from the University of Connecticut and M.D. from the University of Rochester. He completed his internal medicine residency and chief resident year at the University of Vermont, and a fellowship in general internal medicine at the University of North Carolina.Jessie Leyse, M.D., practicing in Berlin, VT, has been selected to receive the Vermont Medical Society’s Physician of the Year Award for 2020. Dr. Leyse, an infectious disease specialist at the Central Vermont Medical Center (CVMC), reportedly worked day and night during the height of the pandemic and continues to endeavor patiently to provide patients and staff alike with answers to questions; adjusting PPE, treatment, testing and staff furlough algorithms weekly. Dr Leyse’s dedication and commitment helped establish CVMC as a leader among hospitals across the state, with her innovative pandemic protocols. This leadership impacted CVMC’s ability to respond to the pandemic and the overall health of the broader community. Dr. Leyse’s nominator calls her a “one-woman-infectious-disease guru” and describes her as not only a great physician, but a tireless mom with a calm, kind yet quick-witted disposition.Dr. Leyse attended Loyola University Chicago for college and medical school. She did a combined residency in Internal Medicine and Pediatrics at Baystate Medical Center in Massachusetts and attended Dartmouth Hitchcock for an  Infectious Disease fellowship. While there, she obtained her Master’s in Public Health as well as doing a residency in Preventive Medicine. Dr. Leyse has traveled internationally to provide medical care including to the Philippines, Guatemala, Haiti, Sub-Saharan Africa, and West Africa during the Ebola outbreak.The Physician of the Year Award is granted annually to a physician licensed in the state of Vermont who has demonstrated: outstanding performance in the quality of care given to his/her patients; skillful and compassionate patient care; and dedication to the welfare of his patients in accordance with accepted principles of good medical practice.Jean Anderrson-Swayze, M.D., of Middlebury, VT, has been selected to receive the Physician Award for Community Services for 2020. Dr. Anderrson-Swayze, a family medicine physician, was nominated for this year’s award for her dedication to international public health and her consistent bravery in helping people who are experiencing times of struggle. She has brought her expertise around the world and volunteered during countless emergency health crises. This April, Dr. Anderrson-Swayze spent a week in New York City, volunteering as a member of the International Medical Corps Disaster Response Team to a COVID surge at Maimonides Hospital in NY, NY. When she returned to Vermont her experience led to early and effective COVID-19 testing in the Middlebury community, keeping patients out of the emergency rooms. She has volunteered to provide medical assistance after health crises in Haiti, Houston, Puerto Rico, Florida and Bahamas. She has also travelled to Greece and Bangladesh to work with refugees and volunteers with Meals on Wheels and at the Open-Door Clinic at home in Vermont.Dr. Anderrson-Swayze practices at the Middlebury Family Health Clinic in Middlebury, Vermont and attended Middlebury College before completing her medical training at the UVM College of Medicine and her residency at Fletcher Allen.The Physician Award for Community Services is granted annually to physicians who have compiled an outstanding record of community service, which, apart from his or her specific identification as a physician, reflects well on the profession.The Citizen of the Year Award recipient for 2020 is Senator Virginia “Ginny” Lyons of Willison, VT. Senator Lyons, the current Chair of the Senate Health and Welfare Committee, has served in the Vermont legislature for twenty years. Her nomination identifies Senator Lyons as a steadfast advocate for public health issues and a true champion for Vermonters’ health. While in the Senate Health and Welfare Committee, Senator Lyons has been at the forefront of public health policy and worked tirelessly to pass legislation to raise the age for tobacco purchases to 21, to ban tobacco flavors, to protect our youngest population by banning crib bumpers and to support reproductive rights. Senator Lyons believes in science, in evidence, and in the experts, and is a true collaborator who works in partnership to make sure that science and evidence is heard from those who dedicate their lives to the practice of medicine.Virginia Lyons of Williston, VT, a Chittenden County Democrat, was born in Auburn, NY. She was educated at Drew University, Rutgers University, and earned her Doctorate at the University of Vermont. She taught at Trinity College, VT, for 27 years.The Citizen of the Year Award is given to a non-physician resident of the state of Vermont who in the past and presently has made a significant contribution to the health of the people of Vermont.Anthony Fauci, M.D., has been selected to receive the VMS Founder’s Award for 2020, for his stalwart leadership during the COVID-19 pandemic. The Founders’ Award is presented to individuals who have demonstrated outstanding leadership, vision, and achievement in improving the health of Vermonters and all Americans.Dr. Fauci’s nomination states, “in this time when so many seem to be turning away from the science and the evidence, you have been a steadfast pillar, constantly bringing us back to these tools that we know are the only way we will be able to help our patients – improving the health of Vermonters and all Americans.” Dr. Fauci’s commitment to following the data and the science while on the front lines of battling this pandemic, can serve as a North Star during these turbulent times.Dr. Fauci is an immunologist who has served as the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases since 1984. He attended the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Massachusetts. After graduating first in his class from New York City’s Cornell Medical College in 1966, he completed his internship and residency at New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center.The VMS Physician Leadership Awards for 2020 will be presented during the awards ceremony being held on Saturday, November 7, 2020, as a part of the Vermont Medical Society’s 207th Virtual Annual Meeting for VMS members and Vermont’s healthcare community. To learn more, go to vtmd.org/annual-meeting(link is external).About the Vermont Medical Society: The Vermont Medical Society is the leading voice of physicians in the state and is dedicated to protecting the health of all Vermonters and improving the environment in which Vermont physicians and physician assistants practice medicine. The Society serves its 2,400 members through public policy advocacy on the state and federal levels, as well as by providing legal, administrative and educational support, producing a rich flow of news and information and offering member benefits that increase medical practice effectiveness and efficiency. For more information, visit www.VTMD.org(link is external).Source: Montpelier, Vt. (October 8, 2020) – Vermont Medical Societylast_img read more

Nova students collect food for the needy

first_img JUST IN TIME FOR THANKSGIVING, Nova Southeastern University Law Center students donated more than 11,000 cans of food to Feeding South Florida. The cans were collected during the “Canned Immunity” food drive held in mid-November. As part of the food drive, law students donated cans in their classes to receive immunity from being called on by the professor for that class. “NSU law students devote thousands of hours each year and boundless energy to helping Broward’s poor,” said Professor Michael Richmond. “My colleagues and I are tremendously proud of their selfless giving — in this case food, and in many others offering free legal assistance to legal aid and others serving the legal needs of the economically disadvantaged.” December 15, 2011 Regular News Nova students collect food for the needylast_img read more

Is High Ability Necessary for Greatness?

first_imgScientific American:As soon as I saw the headline “Research sheds light on origins of greatness”, my interest was piqued. The article is referring to a new paper in Current Directions in Psychological Science, so I immediately downloaded that paper and left the press release open to the side. I’m wary of press releases with these sorts of headlines so best to go right to the source. Scanning the paper, which is coauthored by David Z. Hambrick and Elizabeth J. Meinz, I realize it’s a summary of research they’ve already conducted (some published, some not). As I read about their studies I noticed that not one of them actually looked at greatness.In a nutshell, their impressive body of research shows that working memory —the ability to simultaneously hold information in memory while processing other information—is correlated with performance on different “complex tasks” in the laboratory, including remembering baseball information, Texas Hold’em poker performance (their manuscript on this topic is submitted for publication), memory for the movement of spaceships and baseball players, and piano sight-reading performance. What’s more, working memory performance is still correlated with these “complex tasks” even among individuals with high levels of specific experience and knowledge for the domain. Hambrick and Meinz conclude “although deliberate practice may well be necessary to reach a very high level of skill, it is not always sufficient.”Read the whole story: Scientific American More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

F1 puts some staff on furlough, execs take pay cuts

first_img LIVE TV With nearly half of the season already altered by the coronavirus pandemic, Formula One said Wednesday it will furlough half of its staff until the end of May and senior executives will take pay cuts.F1 called off last month’s Australian Grand Prix and has postponed seven more races so far this season. The Monaco Grand Prix was canceled outright. More postponements are likely to turn into cancellations, but F1 has said it is still hoping to stage between 15 and 18 races out of the original 22.F1 said senior leadership figures will take “voluntary pay cuts while still continuing to work and not in furlough,” and that CEO Chase Carey will take a “much deeper” pay cut. The McLaren and Williams teams had already put some staff on furlough schemes. McLaren drivers Lando Norris and Carlos Sainz have also taken pay cuts. The season is currently scheduled to begin in France on June 28, but each missed race hits teams’ earnings from sponsorship and other commercial activities.That’s a challenge for all the teams, but even more so for those which don’t have the backing of a major car manufacturer like Ferrari or Mercedes, or a multinational company like Red Bull. F1’s business model has proved more vulnerable than most sports to the disruption caused by the coronavirus. Even if races are held without fans, they still require teams to fly in hundreds of staff from around the world who often work on the cars in cramped pit-lane conditions. Mass events of various kinds are banned in many of the countries which host F1 races.That vulnerability was exposed last month when the Australian Grand Prix was called off hours before Friday practice was due to begin. That was after McLaren withdrew when one of its staff members tested positive for the virus. Even if F1 does find enough time to schedule 18 races around the world, that would be the shortest season since 2009. A 15-race season would be the shortest since 1981. Last Updated: 8th April, 2020 21:17 IST F1 Puts Some Staff On Furlough, Execs Take Pay Cuts With nearly half of the season already altered by the coronavirus pandemic, Formula One said Wednesday it will furlough half of its staff until the end of May and senior executives will take pay cuts.F1 called off last month’s Australian Grand Prix and has postponed seven more races so far this season Written By First Published: 8th April, 2020 21:17 IST Associated Press Television News center_img FOLLOW US WATCH US LIVE COMMENT SUBSCRIBE TO USlast_img read more

Pearl Jam, ELO, Journey & more inducted into Rock Hall of Fame

first_img Related Powered by WPeMatico Eddie Vedder and Pearl Jam perform at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony; Kevin Mazur/WireImage for Rock and Roll Hall of Fame(BROOKLYN, NY) — No, Steve Perry didn’t sing with Journey. But Friday night at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, New York, there was a whole lot of music at this year’s Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony, now in its 32nd year.  Here’s how it went down:Pearl JamThe crowd at the Barclays Center was pretty much there to see one band: Pearl Jam. They started chanting “Eddie, Eddie” during the opening remarks.  David Letterman, filling in for an ailing Neil Young, did a brilliant job inducting the group, which appeared on his shows 10 times over the years. In a lengthy, hilarious and touching speech, Letterman praised the group as “a true living cultural organism…they would recognize injustice and they would stand up for it.”He also shared a personal story about how Eddie Vedder gave his young son Harry a small guitar and wrote him a letter saying that he’d buy him a bigger one if he learned just one song.  Letterman said that in his opinion, actions like that are the reason that the band’s in the Hall of Fame.At the podium, Eddie Vedder took the opportunity to address climate change, but also gave heartfelt thanks to their fan community, as every band member did.  The band then played “Alive” — with Dave Krusen on drums for the first time in 25 years — as well as “Given to Fly” and “Better Man.”Vedder made a special point of thanking Michael J. Fox, who was in the audience, for writing in his book about how much “Given to Fly” inspired him, and said it was an honor to play it for the actor Friday night.  The night ended with Pearl Jam and all the inductees coming together for a rendition of Neil Young’s “Rockin’ in the Free World.”JourneyAll anyone wanted to know going into the ceremony on Friday was whether former singer Steve Perry would show up, and if so, would he sing?  Well, Perry did show up, joining his band mates on stage to accept the honor, presented to them by lifelong fan Pat Monahan of Train, who said it was “about damn time” the group was inducted.Perry warmly embraced his band mates, all of whom thanked their loyal fans for standing by them.  “We would not be here had it not been for you and your tireless love and consistent devotion. You never have stopped,” said Perry. “I’ve been gone a long time, I understand that, but I want you to know that you’ve never not been in my heart…I love each and every one of you.”With current lead singer Arnel Pineda — who met Perry for the first time backstage on Friday night — Journey then performed “Separate Ways,” “Lights” and, of course, “Don’t Stop Believin’.”  The band was joined by former keyboardist Gregg Rolie and former drummer Aynsley Dunbar for “Lights.”YesThe British prog-rock band was inducted by Geddy Lee and Alex Lifeson of Rush.  Lifeson’s speech was a takeoff on the “Choose Life” speech from the beginning of the movie Trainspotting. “Choose ‘Roundabout,’” he said, “Choose the glorious guitar work in ‘Owner of a Lonely Heart.’  Choose the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. And definitely choose Yes.”  Lee said that being able to induct the band was “righting a terrible wrong,” as they’d been eligible for years.“Truly, this for the Yes fans everywhere,” said former lead singer Jon Anderson.  “I went to the Hall of Fame about four years ago…and all my heroes were there, every one of them…and we’re gonna join them!  I can’t believe it! It’s truly amazing.”Keyboardist Rick Wakeman had the audience cracking up with his speech, which included a number of off-color jokes about masturbation, prostate exams, strip clubs, and the boredom of marital sex.Geddy Lee then filled in for late Yes bass player Chris Squire as the band performed “Roundabout” and “Owner of a Lonely Heart.” Wakeman wore his signature cape, and some band members walked through the audience at one point while performing.Electric Light OrchestraThe British band opened the ceremony with their hit version of “Roll Over Beethoven,” in tribute to the late Chuck Berry.  Dhani Harrison, son of the late George Harrison, inducted ELO, noting that they were the first band he saw in concert when he was seven, and he was blown away by their otherworldliness.  He continued the “ELO are aliens” theme throughout the speech.  Noting that when he saw them in concert right after the November election, he said, “Trust me when I say everyone in L.A. was staring at the spaceship thinking, ‘Take me with you!’”At the podium, ELO frontman Jeff Lynne, who’s worked with everyone from Harrison to Ringo Starr, Tom Petty, Bob Dylan and Roy Orbison, said, “It’s such a pleasure to get one of these [trophies] ’cause I’ve watched hundreds of people gettin’ ’em all the time…it’s like me dad said: “Everything comes to him what waits.’”The band then performed “Evil Woman” and “Mr. Blue Sky.”And the RestJackson Browne inducted Joan Baez, who joked that she knew that many young people would have no idea who she was.  “My own granddaughter had no idea who I was,” Baez said to laughter. “Until I took her backstage at a Taylor Swift concert.”  In 2015, Swift invited Baez onstage during her concert in San Francisco.On a serious note, the folk music legend and activist turned President Trump’s words back on him with a call to action.  “Let us together repeal and replace brutality and make compassion a priority,” she said. “Together, let us build a bridge — a great bridge, a beautiful bridge — to once again welcome the tired and the poor.”Baez performed “Swing Low, Sweet Chariot” and was joined by the Indigo Girls and Mary Chapin Carpenter for “The Night they Drove Old Dixie Down” and “Deportee (Plane Wreck at Los Gatos).”Songwriter, producer and Chic leader Nile Rodgers was given a special award of “artistic merit” by Pharrell Williams.  Onstage, Rodgers joked that he’d worked with nearly every artist who’s in the Hall of Fame — including Madonna, David Bowie and Mick Jagger.Snoop Dogg inducted his friend, the late rapper Tupac Shakur, and accepted the award on his behalf, saying, “I know you’re gonna live forever, ’cause legends always do. They can’t take this away from you, homie…I love you Tupac. Welcome to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Thug life!”  Snoop, Alicia Keys and rappers Treach, T.I. and YG performed a medley of Pac’s songs.Friday night’s ceremony also included a Prince tribute by Lenny Kravitz, who performed “When Doves Cry” and “The Cross.”The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony will air on HBO April 29.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.center_img No, Steve Perry didn’t sing with Journey. But Friday night at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, New York, there was a whole lot of music at this year’s Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony, now in its 32nd year.  Here’s how it went down:Pearl Jam The crowd at the Barclays Center was pretty much there to see one band: Pearl Jam. They started chanting “Eddie, Eddie” during the opening remarks.  David Letterman, filling in for an ailing Neil Young, did a brilliant job inducting the group, which appeared on his shows 10 times over the years. In a lengthy, hilarious and touching speech, Letterman praised the group as “a true living cultural organism…they would recognize injustice and they would stand up for it.” He also shared a personal story about how Eddie Vedder gave his young son Harry a small guitar and wrote him a letter saying that he’d buy him a bigger one if he learned just one song.  Letterman said that in his opinion, actions like that are the reason that the band’s in the Hall of Fame.At the podium, Eddie Vedder took the opportunity to address climate change, but also gave heartfelt thanks to their fan community, as every band member did.  The band then played “Alive” — with Dave Krusen on drums for the first time in 25 years — as well as “Given to Fly” and “Better Man.” Vedder made a special point of thanking Michael J. Fox, who was in the audience, for writing in his book about how much “Given to Fly” inspired him, and said it was an honor to play it for the actor Friday night.  The night ended with Pearl Jam and all the inductees coming together for a rendition of Neil Young’s “Rockin’ in the Free World.”Journey All anyone wanted to know going into the ceremony on Friday was whether former singer Steve Perry would show up, and if so, would he sing?  Well, Perry did show up, joining his band mates on stage to accept the honor, presented to them by lifelong fan Pat Monahan of Train, who said it was “about damn time” the group was inducted.Perry warmly embraced his band mates, all of whom thanked their loyal fans for standing by them.  “We would not be here had it not been for you and your tireless love and consistent devotion. You never have stopped,” said Perry. “I’ve been gone a long time, I understand that, but I want you to know that you’ve never not been in my heart…I love each and every one of you.”With current lead singer Arnel Pineda — who met Perry for the first time backstage on Friday night — Journey then performed “Separate Ways,” “Lights” and, of course, “Don’t Stop Believin’.”  The band was joined by former keyboardist Gregg Rolie and former drummer Aynsley Dunbar for “Lights.”Yes The British prog-rock band was inducted by Geddy Lee and Alex Lifeson of Rush.  Lifeson’s speech was a takeoff on the “Choose Life” speech from the beginning of the movie Trainspotting. “Choose ‘Roundabout,’” he said, “Choose the glorious guitar work in ‘Owner of a Lonely Heart.’  Choose the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. And definitely choose Yes.”  Lee said that being able to induct the band was “righting a terrible wrong,” as they’d been eligible for years.“Truly, this for the Yes fans everywhere,” said former lead singer Jon Anderson.  “I went to the Hall of Fame about four years ago…and all my heroes were there, every one of them…and we’re gonna join them!  I can’t believe it! It’s truly amazing.” Keyboardist Rick Wakeman had the audience cracking up with his speech, which included a number of off-color jokes about masturbation, prostate exams, strip clubs, and the boredom of marital sex.Geddy Lee then filled in for late Yes bass player Chris Squire as the band performed “Roundabout” and “Owner of a Lonely Heart.” Wakeman wore his signature cape, and some band members walked through the audience at one point while performing.Electric Light Orchestra The British band opened the ceremony with their hit version of “Roll Over Beethoven,” in tribute to the late Chuck Berry.  Dhani Harrison, son of the late George Harrison, inducted ELO, noting that they were the first band he saw in concert when he was seven, and he was blown away by their otherworldliness.  He continued the “ELO are aliens” theme throughout the speech.  Noting that when he saw them in concert right after the November election, he said, “Trust me when I say everyone in L.A. was staring at the spaceship thinking, ‘Take me with you!’”At the podium, ELO frontman Jeff Lynne, who’s worked with everyone from Harrison to Ringo Starr, Tom Petty, Bob Dylan and Roy Orbison, said, “It’s such a pleasure to get one of these [trophies] ’cause I’ve watched hundreds of people gettin’ ’em all the time…it’s like me dad said: “Everything comes to him what waits.’”The band then performed “Evil Woman” and “Mr. Blue Sky.”And the RestJackson Browne inducted Joan Baez, who joked that she knew that many young people would have no idea who she was.  “My own granddaughter had no idea who I was,” Baez said to laughter. “Until I took her backstage at a Taylor Swift concert.”  In 2015, Swift invited Baez onstage during her concert in San Francisco.On a serious note, the folk music legend and activist turned President Trump‘s words back on him with a call to action.  “Let us together repeal and replace brutality and make compassion a priority,” she said. “Together, let us build a bridge — a great bridge, a beautiful bridge — to once again welcome the tired and the poor.”Baez performed “Swing Low, Sweet Chariot” and was joined by the Indigo Girls and Mary Chapin Carpenter for “The Night they Drove Old Dixie Down” and “Deportee (Plane Wreck at Los Gatos).”Songwriter, producer and Chic leader Nile Rodgers was given a special award of “artistic merit” by Pharrell Williams.  Onstage, Rodgers joked that he’d worked with nearly every artist who’s in the Hall of Fame — including Madonna, David Bowie and Mick Jagger.Snoop Dogg inducted his friend, the late rapper Tupac Shakur, and accepted the award on his behalf, saying, “I know you’re gonna live forever, ’cause legends always do. They can’t take this away from you, homie…I love you Tupac. Welcome to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Thug life!”  Snoop, Alicia Keys and rappers Treach, T.I. and YG performed a medley of Pac’s songs.Friday night’s ceremony also included a Prince tribute by Lenny Kravitz, who performed “When Doves Cry” and “The Cross.”last_img read more